Lilies, anyone?

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
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Joined: 2009-12-15

When does the clump of formosanum flower?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lilium formosanum var. pricei blooms in mid July for me.  Considerably earlier than the species type.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Barstow
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Joined: 2010-08-27

The many times I've tried this one it's proven to be premonocarpic; i.e., it dies before it gets a  chance to flower  ;)

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Lilium formosanum var. pricei blooms in mid July for me.  Considerably earlier than the species type.

Just checked my past photos, typically it blooms in early July here, but last year with an unusually early spring, it bloomed late June.  Here's a photo taken 06-26-2011.  Stephen, my guess is you don't get much seed on your premonocarpic form ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lilium rosthornii is closely related to Lilium henryi.  The type of clone I have is somewhat common, where the petal edges are whitish, and the young buds are white before turning orange and then opening.  In the photo the white bud is actually the youngest and smallest, but appears larger because of its proximity to the camera lens.  The bicolor effect of buds and flowers is very pleasing.

       

This species is where the "blackheart" characteristic of aurelian hybrid lilies originate.  Mine, however, has a green heart:

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, my plants are still in bud! It is one of the latest lilies to flower for me.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I just dug Lilium szovitsianum, and unlike most species lilies, these bulbs are big!  The photo shows two bulbs from the one plant, grown from a two year old,  dinky seedling I bought in 2004.  The lily had been sending up two shoots for several years.  I was pleased to find that many new roots had initiated at the base of the bulbs, and are about a centimeter long.

It was surprising that the top of the bulb was only about 3cm below the surface.  Is this normal?  Perhaps it is because it grows in rich clay soil, rather than sandy soil?

Any thoughts are appreciated...

Lilium szovitsianum bulbs

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Regarding the depth in the soil of the L. szovitsianum bulb, I've been asking around and have found from a couple experienced growers that they are usually very deeply set in the ground.  One, who gardens in northern Canada has multiple 3 inch diameter bulbs that have naturally pulled themselves at least 6 inches down.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have experienced surfacing lily bulbs but the reason was crowding. When I started digging I found layers of bulbs about a foot deep. They had had no space sideways and had gone up instead.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

RickR wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Do you think any of the western lilies could do here?
I am very fascinated by lilies but as I have told slugs devour the plants as fast as I get them. At my summerhouse though they fare better. However there I have to watch for lily beetles >:( Still many lilies do very well there.

I don't think I can say.  I'm just not knowledgeable enough with these.  Many like a long dry summer, but cool and wet winter/spring.  L. columbianum (known to be more easily cultivated) seems to survive for certain people in the UK, and L. pardalinum likes wetter situations throughout the year, so...

Perhaps Gene Mirro will lend some advice here.

It is almost impossible to grow lilies with a slug infestation.  I kill them with metaldehyde bait.  They will even eat the bulbs, and you will not know until it is too late.  If you can't get bait, try copper sulphate.  That's what the oldtimers used.

If your winters are not too cold (no big freezes), NW native lilies will be happy.  Some NW lilies have snow cover all winter, but the soil does not get much below 0C (32F).  I have never tried to grow NW lilies in a very cold climate, so I don't know if it is possible.  But I am not optimistic.

If your summers are wet, the pardalinum group is the best choice.  You can also try maritimum, parryi, wigginsi, and parvum.  If you want to try the dryland lilies, I recommend building a bed of pure coarse sand at least 8 inches deep.  Never let lily soil get hot.  Mulch with wood chips, and grow companion plants that are not too competitive. Don't use plants that make basal rosettes, such as foxgloves, because they shelter slugs.  My favorite is Corydalis sempervirens.  It will reseed itself forever, but it is not hard to control.  Platycodon is also good, and reseeds in my garden.  Native lilies will grow in part shade, but they are much stronger in full sun, if you can keep the soil cool.

Everyone says that L. columbianum is easy, but I find that many of the bulbs rot in summer, even in Oregon.  Try growing them in sand.  The most difficult NW species in my opinion is bolanderi.  I have never gotten it to bloom.  I am trying again.  In nature, it grows in places that get very hot and dry in the summer, like the Siskiyou mountains.  And it is always growing through low brush (Manzanita), which keeps the soil shaded, cool, and dry.  It is a serpentine soil plant, but I believe it will grow in sandy or gravelly garden soil in the right conditions.

If you grow species lilies in a greenhouse, the big problem is high soil temperature in the pots.  The bulbs will rot in warm, wet mix.  It helps to plunge the pots and grow companion plants with the lilies, to keep the soil on the dry side.  Even so, you will sometimes find that the bulbs have rotted during the late summer when temperatures are highest.

If anyone wants some seed of true martagon album, let me know.  I also have lots of L. wigginsi seed.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

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