amazing Apiaceae (the umbellifers)

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14
amazing Apiaceae (the umbellifers)

NARGS member Tim Ingram mentioned his interest in Lomatium, a North American genus of umbellifers.
See: http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=662.0;topicseen

The plant family Apiaceae is huge, with 347 plant genera, with many species of interest for rock gardens, so let me start up this topic with links to another North American genus, Cymopteris.

I share an enthusiasm for rock-garden-sized Apiaceae, and have long admired both Lomatium and Cymopteris when I've seen them both in photos and during my Western American travels years ago... some are truly superb. Here are some selected links to photos of Western American species of Cymopteris.

fruiting heads on Cymopteris cinerarius
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0908+0697
flowering Cymopteris cinerarius, fantastic foliage
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0908+0696

Cymopteris gilmanii

http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+1210+1537

Cymopteris globosus
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0306+0913

Cymopteris multinervatus

http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+1004+0875

Cymopteris purpurescens
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0310+1410
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?enlarge=0000+0000+0308+0075

Some Apiaceae that I've seen photos of, in places such as Kazakhstan, and in New Zealand and Australia, show these are fantastic foliage plants, with strangely beautiful flowers.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Really remarkable plants, Mark! I didn't know such treasures existed. Now you have given me a problem - shall I ignore them or look out for seed?! And I have several years to retirement. . . .

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I was very pleased to see seedlings of Cymopterus --I think its planosus, but would have to check--they were sown in spring last year, early enough for some cold strat, but maybe not enough-- I got one seedling, which I think didn't survive, so I thought that seed was done for, and didn't even put the pot with others that were overwintering outside.. well, there are at least several coming up now :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I have encountered Cymopterus globosus in it's native haunts. The flowers have rather thick petals very densly packed. The immature fruiting bodies feel like dense, bumpy rubber balls.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

John, what do you call such a plant? Showy? Beautiful? Spectacular? Anyway it is a remarkable plant :)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

My interest in these plants is being rapidly reignited. Thanks for the images and websites. I have also grown Shoshonea in the past, but didn't look after it well enough. There are some wonderful Mediterranean species adapted to similar but not so winter cold conditions - Athamanta turbith is probably my favourite. Another, Thapsia maxima, has large broad pleated leaves and a football size head of yellow flowers only to about a metre high. It is an extraordinary and fascinating family once you get into it!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Weiser wrote:

I have encountered Cymopterus globosus in it's native haunts. The flowers have rather thick petals very densly packed. The immature fruiting bodies feel like dense, bumpy rubber balls.

seriously cool, and at a glance, un-Apiaceae looking!

Tim, agreed, very cool family :)
There is another I've been looking at, I think a Lomatium, which is a metre or so tall, plus Anthriscus and others, and I have Heracleum growing naturally here--so they do have lots of appeal/potential besides the regular rock garden :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Hoy wrote:

John, what do you call such a plant? Showy? Beautiful? Spectacular? Anyway it is a remarkable plant :)

Strangely, remarkably, cool??? Comes to mind.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Tim wrote:

My interest in these plants is being rapidly reignited. Thanks for the images and websites. I have also grown Shoshonea in the past, but didn't look after it well enough. There are some wonderful Mediterranean species adapted to similar but not so winter cold conditions - Athamanta turbith is probably my favourite. !

Fascinating plants being shown!
I can verify that Athamanta turbith ssp. haynaldii is reliably hardy in this zone 3 area, even without snow cover.  I believe Rick grows it in zone 4(?) too.
Shoshonea pulvinata wintered over last year here in a trough... no real record yet, but so far, so good!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

I currently only grow only two Lomatiums but there are many around. I like the short matted types with gray leaves.
Lomatium austiniae (syn. L. plummerae)

Lomatium nevadense var nevadense. The flowers always look like they have been peppered. It's the dark purple staymens that give this effect.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Weiser wrote:

I currently only grow only two Lomatiums but there are many around. I like the short matted types with gray leaves.
Lomatium austiniae (syn. L. plummerae)

Lomatium nevadense var nevadense. The flowers always look like they have been peppered. It's the dark purple staymens that give this effect.

Both cool!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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