amazing Apiaceae (the umbellifers)

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Skulski wrote:

Well, live and learn!  :)

Here's Shoshonea pulvinata in a trough, wintered over from last year - a tiny thing at present.   I've only seen it in photos... I expect the flower stems will elongate, unless this is some particularly dwarfish form??   I got it from Beaver Creek, at last year's CRAGS spring plant sale.

Cute!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

Well, live and learn!  :)

Here's Shoshonea pulvinata in a trough, wintered over from last year - a tiny thing at present.   I've only seen it in photos... I expect the flower stems will elongate, unless this is some particularly dwarfish form??   I got it from Beaver Creek, at last year's CRAGS spring plant sale.

I would hardly guessed that this is a Apiaceae!

Here Brunnera makes runners and selfsow but not much.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Barstow
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A selection of my umbellifers:

1. Lomatium nudicaule: of the 10 or so I’ve tried, 5 have survived and this is the easiest and the only one to have flowered and seeded itself.
2). L. californicum (survived one winter and then died in the subsequent more severe winter)
3-6. I’m not sure which 2 species these are, but they’ve proven reliably hardy here having survived 4 or 5 winters. Just contrast the leaves of these with nudicaule … The possibilities are L. dissectum, utriculatum and triternatum (there are two pictures of each). Any suggestions?  
7. Lovage, Levisticum officinale is one of the grandest umbellifers and looks particularly smart when blanched in springtime (it then doesn’t taste unlike celery and much milder than unblanched)
8. Laser trilobum (I also grow Laserpitium siler and latifolium, all 3 reliably hardy here, down to about -23C)
9. Angelica keiskei – surprised me to see that the sap is yellow!
10. Angelica sylvestris “Vicar’s Mead” is also a nice foliage plant (like the Anthriscus) – here with Trillium camtschacensis and Hylomecon japonicum  

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Very nice, Stephen.  Ahh, I was thinking about what to plant in a big area where we removed a huge old lilac last fall... Angelica would be suitably statuesque!  Lots of great ideas in your photos... lovage is worth growing for its appearance alone (aside from using the leaves for flavouring) - I should get myself another one.
Here are a couple more fairly interesting umbellifers:

Peucedanum ostruthium 'Daphnis' - I don't have many variegated plants but I am fond of this one (though, strangely, I have few good photos of it):
 

Pleurospermum szechenyii:
 
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200015840

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori, does the Pleurospermum remain that colour, or is that just spring foliage?

Some of these remind of several local umbellifers I am fond of, I'll have to dig up pictures--such as the very charming, subtle Sweet Cicely (blunt-fruited; Osmorhiza depauperata) which is common in the woods here.. I sent seed to Stephen, hopefully he gets some babies :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

Lori, does the Pleurospermum remain that colour, or is that just spring foliage?

It's actually dark purple throughout the season.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Barstow
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Joined: 2010-08-27

Lori: I've overwintered Peucedanum ostruthium 'Daphnis' (nice pictures) for the first time this year! Nice Pleurospermum too!

Cohan: I wonder what happened to the Osmorhiza you sent me (it was in the fall wasn't it?). I haven't noticed them germinating (my pots are in a bit of disarray as a cat got into my cold frame with winter stratified seeds and labels were everywhere... I have otherwise Osmorhiza longistylis (picture) and O. claytonii:

 

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori--then wow!

Stephen, it may have been mid-winter when I sent the seed, though I'm not sure, I might have a pm record of it.. if it does not appear eventually, let me know, I can get more seed this year...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Great to see those various umbels. Stephen you have had better success with Lomatiums than me - I have grown nudicaule and californicum and a few others but had them on a gritty raised bed that may have been too dry and well drained, they never really got going well. I used to sell a few Laser trilobum on the nursery which shows there are gardeners who have a fascination with these plants - you could hardly call it showy. Lori's photo of Shoshonea is nice; this is definitely a plant I will try again - it is reminiscent of Olymposciadum caespitosum, which still grows on my raised bed and on the shady side of this, in deep grit, I have at last succeeded in getting Bolax gummifera to grow (this is a wonderful cushion plant often seen at the Shows and which I must have tried three or four times to date - its relative Azorella trifurcata is much easier and has made a lovely vivid green mat).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

The latest umbel to flower - Orlaya grandiflora - an annual species that more than lives up to its name. I am not sure how many gardeners grow it but it flowers just at the right time for the Chelsea Show and is often used on displays there. This and Ammi majus are both superb dry meadow plants mixed with poppies and the like.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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