Boulder Pass, Ptarmigan Lake, Banff N. P. - August 14, 2010

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27
Boulder Pass, Ptarmigan Lake, Banff N. P. - August 14, 2010

Here are a few shots from a hike into the start of the very popular Skoki Loop route, in Banff National Park... we went across Boulder Pass, the first point of interest, and wandered around Ptarmigan Lake, and called it a day.
Rather than belabour a lot of plant species I've shown in other threads, I'll just show some of the different and interesting ones here.
1) Leaving the forest and looking west from meadow, at Mount Temple and the Seven Sisters, in the distance
2, 3) Platanthera dilatata, in wet meadow
4, 5) Scenery, and approaching Boulder Pass, on the flank of Redoubt Mt.
6) Lots of butterflies... pardon the subject matter, but they are frequently interested in horse dung, as shown here.
7, 8 ) I've only seen this plant in one other place - Pedicularis contorta - lots of them around Boulder Pass
9) Boulder Pass

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

More dramatic scenery!  I would have thought it too late in the season for much blooms now.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I wonder why they call it Boulder Pass ;D  The Pedicularis contorta is an odd thing isn't it, as some Pedics can be.  Plantanthera dilatata is very handsome.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The bloom was surprisingly advanced up here, as compared to the previous hikes in Kananaskis... though more in line with mid-August, in a normal year... I'm baffled.   ???

I'm fond of Pedicularis... would like to try growing them but I think conditions would be far too dry here, without special measures... although having said that, this particular species seemed to grow in somewhat drier conditions...

A few more:
1, 2) Erigeron compositus and Epilobium latifolium at Boulder Pass.  (We haven't been here in summer in 20+ years (Stuart skiis this area though), and it actually did not seem to be so much the "natural rock garden" that I had remembered fondly from way back when.  Oh well, just my faulty memory, no doubt!)
3) Ptarmigan Lake, with Fossil Mountain on the left
4, 5) Tundra-like conditions around the lake
6) A late Caltha leptosepala in a mossy seep from a spring that runs into the lake
7) Anemone occidentalis  
8 ) Senecio triangularis, in bloom here on the wet lake shore
9) Haplopappus lyallii in a rockier area
10) Tilted Mountain, a very distinctive peak, in the distance

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

1) scenery
2) Cotton grass, Eriophorum sp., on the wet shore
3) Last look at Boulder Pass/Redoubt as we head back
4) Beautiful Juncus sp. in the boggy areas
5) Back towards tree line, a band of Larix lyallii... not a bad area for an easy fall larch hike
6) Many extremely white Castilleja in the montane meadows in this area
7) Moneses uniflora, back in the forest
8, 9) A new one for me, Senecio pauciflorus, alpine groundsel (with Valeriana sitchensis in the background)
10) Wonderful little scenes along the forest trail... beautiful fresh mushrooms in a bed of sphagnum

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

And continuing on the theme of simple plants, etc., for a bit...
1, 2) A gorgeous rotted log splendidly clothed in false pixie-cup (Cladonia chlorophaea), a club lichen
3) Fascinating fungi... I haven't figured out what this is yet; hints?  Edit:  It's Clavaria purpurea.
4, 5) I've finally figured out (I think) what this interesting stuff is that covers rotting wood in the boreal forest... a crust lichen, Icmadophila ericetorum; common names, "spraypaint" and "fairy puke"... !  (I'm rather taken by the latter - "fairy puke" - and vow to use it from now on.  ;D)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Superb images, Lori ... let's hope that more people are attracted to this topic.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Hey, if fairy puke doesn't bring 'em in by the droves, what will?!?  ;)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Great pics as usual, Lori.  Isn't int interesting how the name "Seven Sisters" is so often used.  Our Seven Sisters in Minnesota is a an area of prairie encompassing seven very large hills.  (We have no mountains, although I think the highest point in the state is called "Mt. Jasper."  It has nice striated formations of iron and jasper.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

And continuing on the theme of simple plants, etc., for a bit...
1, 2) A gorgeous rotted log splendidly clothed in false pixie-cup (Cladonia chlorophaea), a club lichen
3) Fascinating fungi... I haven't figured out what this is yet; hints?
4, 5) I've finally figured out (I think) what this interesting stuff is that covers rotting wood in the boreal forest... a crust lichen, Icmadophila ericetorum; common names, spraypaint and fairy puke... !  (I'm rather taken by the latter - "fairy puke" - and vow to use it from now on.  ;D)

I never get tired of looking at your pictures, Lori, it being plants, "simple plants" (you know, fungi are more related to animals than to plants!) or scenery.
Your fascinating fungus, can it be a kind of Telephora?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks, Rick and Trond!
Yes, I knew I was on "thin ice" with my intended segue into the lichen photos... I was hoping the "simple plants" reference would cover off the moss, lichen, while "etc." would refer to the fungi... not quite so smooth a transition as I had hoped!  :D :D  
Re. Telephora - I'm sure if you suggest it, it is very likely.  I'll have to look it up, and will report back.  I know very little about fungi, lichens, etc., but it will be fascinating to learn.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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