Beautiful plants in the Dolomites

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Anne, thanks for supplying so many OMG-moments; seeing fine photos of spectacular plants that take one's breath away, like Thlaspi rotundifolia, Saxifraga caesia, and Soldanella minima.  Your photos are of high quality, may I ask what camera do you use? 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Just four images from me to introduce you all to the glorious situation of Corvara - the town in the Dolomites that attracts both Anne and I to return to these beautiful mountains year after year. The formidable massif of Sassongher dominates the town and provides a spectacular backdrop to every activity.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

McDonough wrote:

Anne, thanks for supplying so many OMG-moments; seeing fine photos of spectacular plants that take one's breath away, like Thlaspi rotundifolia, Saxifraga caesia, and Soldanella minima.  Your photos are of high quality, may I ask what camera do you use? 

/Hi Mark, we use a Sony Cyber Shot, DSC H10 with a 10X Zoom.  I can use it with no problem which means that it's really user-friendly.  Alan Bradshaw of Alplains Seed Catalog told me about it when I admired his photos.  We've really liked it a lot. Joe takes better pictures (more patience).  Incidentally, many thanks for the compliment which I'll share with Joe who takes 90% of the pictures.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Booker wrote:

Just four images from me to introduce you all to the glorious situation of Corvara - the town in the Dolomites that attracts both Anne and I to return to these beautiful mountains year after year. The formidable massif of Sassongher dominates the town and provides a spectacular backdrop to every activity.

Beautiful shots, Cliff.  It makes me homesick for Corvara.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I have thought for several years that I ought to go to the Dolomites. Now I know for certain!
Thanks, Anne (and Cliff).

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Another day and another hike.  The plants seen this day included Ranunculus seguieri as we had never seen it before.  The flowers were perfect, the wind hadn't had a chance to make them ragged and it was difficult to find a plant that didn't have pollinators busy at work.  Oh yes, the rest of the plants were also sensational! Last photo is R. seguieri taken on the way up with the best yet to come.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Part 2 of a sensational day.  The Ranunculus seguieri (last picture in previous post) was so beautiful and so pristine.  Often you see ragged flowers thanks to it usually liking exposed positions with wind.

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

And Part 3 of a great plant day!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

"Pristine" certainly is the word for Ranunculus seguieri - breathtaking!  Very beautiful plants and photos; the soldanella and pulsatilla are particularly outstanding.  So interesting to see, also, a plant that will not stop traffic but is fascinating in it's own right - the Minuartia.  What a lovely Hutchinsia alpina, growing in habitat (such a contrast to the sorry ones in my yard.  Oy!)

Your last photo - the view - is absolutely magnificent.  What range of elevation gains do these hikes involve?  I'm curious also about how many people would you see in a day on the same trails?  Roughly only... a few, many tens, more?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

This last trail is a very popular one because there's a cable car to the top from the Pass.  We always see people walking down and have some company also on the way up. Later today I'll post pictures of a favorite trail where we see very few if any people.  I'm not sure of the elevation gain - it's a long, steady "up".  You don't really notice the climb that much since there's so much to see along the way.  The pictures posted are highlights, the tip of the iceberg.

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