Not alpine but lot of rocks

25 posts / 0 new
Last post
Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Holes in the bedrock made by grinding stones in running water under the cover of ice during the last ice age. These holes can be several meters deep and wide. We call them "jettegryter" = "giants pans". Do you have a word for such holes in English?

Here a bullrush finds enough water even in dry spells in summer.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lotus corniculatus is very common. You can find it from the seashore to high up in the mountains.
Seakale smells and tastes - very strongly - as kale. Too late for flowers though.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Last pictures for this time. Takes time to load these with a cellphone!

Minilakes almost like the fjords.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Terrific set of photos.  What a fascinating area for a coastal hike!

Hoy wrote:

Potentilla anserina cowers large patches with creeping stems.

Another circumpolar one that I haven't seen in a while.  Oddly enough, there's a British Columbia plant nursery that sells it, and claims it to be a zone 6 plant!  ;D

Hoy wrote:

Tiny but handsome Geranium.
Calystegia sepium where it belongs at the seashore.

Yes, to all comments!

Hoy wrote:

Holes in the bedrock made by grinding stones in running water under the cover of ice during the last ice age. We call them "jettegryter" = "giants pans". Do you have a word for such holes in English?

You know, I think there is likely a word, but I'll be darned if I can come up with one!  "Plunge pool" is about the closest I can think of - where rocks are blasted around in a pocket by the force of water, and continue to erode out a chute. 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plunge_pool
(Water-eroded pockets like that may be called tinaja in the desert southwest U.S., but that's not quite the same... not normally glacially-related, I don't think.)

Nice to see seakale in it's natural habitat.  (I grow it but it won't bloom for a while yet.)  Same for birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus).

Nice tour of the island!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Holes in the bedrock made by grinding stones in running water under the cover of ice during the last ice age. These holes can be several meters deep and wide. We call them "jettegryter" = "giants pans". Do you have a word for such holes in English?

Here a bullrush finds enough water even in dry spells in summer.

Interesting travels Trond, some of the rock formations are most scenic.  Not small holes, but larger ones caused by glaciation, are called "kettle ponds" or "kettle holes", see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kettle_%28landform%29

I was going to joke that we get these large holes in the road every winter in spring, pot holes, but I guess these kettle holes can be called potholes too, based on the wikipedia link.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Kettle holes are a little different again... not caused by erosion by rocks and flowing water, but rather, by subsequent melting of a block of ice that became encased in glacial sediments as the glaciers melted back.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I think Lori is right, Mark, kettleholes is called "kjelehull" (same word) or "dødisgrop (= dead ice pit) in Norwegian. It is a different kind of formation.
It is a fine area for coastal hike but you have to use a boat!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Just like I have said to Todd, about liking and learning about wild New Foundland by his photos, yours are equally interesting, Trond.  All of them!!!

We have a few rock formations in Minnesota that have shallow, ephemeral pools that support fairly rare, and often endangered species of plants and amphibians.  Our native Phemeranthus parviflorum(Talinum parviflorum) & Phemeranthus rugospermus(T. rugosum) are among them, although not considered rare.  Your pools do seem a lot deeper than ours, and ours are not formed by what almost looks like cracks in the rock in your photos.  rather, they are shallow depressions on the rock surfaces.

We call those holes "pothole", geologically speaking.  Minnesota boasts the deepest (60ft. x 12-15ft.) and most concentrated number of them in the world.  They are in Interstate State Park, only about 100 miles away from me.  It's really a cool place to visit, and not just for the potholes.
http://files.dnr.state.mn.us/destinations/state_parks/interstate/interst...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Thank you, Rick, it's apleasure to show you (albeit timeconsuming with a cellphone!).

Your link is very interesting! I think pothole is the same as  Norwegian "jettegryte". The biggest in Norway is 100m deep and 40m wide. The place is called Hell (Helvete)
http://www.fjordnorge.dk/norsk/naturfenomen_no.htm

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

100m x 40m, Wow!!!  From the description given, your Norwegian potholes are formed the same way ours are.  I guess our DNR (Department of Natural Resources) has not done its homework.  Minnesota certainly doesn't have the deepest potholes in the world!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Pages

Log in or register to post comments