Acantholimon

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Nold wrote:

They're fun to set on fire, too, when dead.

I was actually relieved when the acantholimons here decided to call it a day. They had gotten so large they were growing into each other and looked fairly disgraceful.
They make lots of acrid smoke that lasts for about half an hour.

Bob
  p.s You can tell which seeds are viable by looking at the tube; thin ones aren't viable.

Maybe they (Acantholimon) should've duked it out with your romping out-of-control sempervivums that devoured your garden ;D

Burning Acantholimon hummocks and acrid smoke, sounds like a nightmare.  Why were they set on fire?  At least with Dictamnus (ignitable Gas Plant), the action of ignition is not of permanent detriment to the plant.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Fire?
I wish I would have know that.  I just had a one foot wide one croak this winter.

It would have been fun. Setting an individual prairie plant ablaze is a blast, albeit a very short lived escapade. 8)

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

I remember a picture Jim Archibald showed of a Turkish Villager with a huge mound of dead acantholimons behind the house for winter "firewood": they do produce heat with all the resins in their foliage which can get hot indeed.

I'm off to California for a few weeks so I shan't be posting much for a while...Hope everyone is well,

PK

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

I remember a picture Jim Archibald showed of a Turkish Villager with a huge mound of dead acantholimons behind the house for winter "firewood": they do produce heat with all the resins in their foliage which can get hot indeed.   

There's the answer. There should be some fun in gardening along with all the disappointment and misery .....

They catch fire, release massive quantities of acantholimon smoke, then glow very satisfyingly for quite some time.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I've never grown these plants well, and hardly ever had a flower. That last photo of Panayoti's is superb and makes me want to start rock gardening all over again. Curious since all the plants are pretty much the same and there are no flowers! I think, like Mark says, it is comfortable and pleasing and you could imagine being on a hillside in Turkey.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Nold wrote:

There's the answer. There should be some fun in gardening along with all the disappointment and misery .....
They catch fire, release massive quantities of acantholimon smoke, then glow very satisfyingly for quite some time.

Bob

Okay, I'll give you that one Bob, we'll add Acantholimon to the growing list of pyrotechnic plants; only Acantholimon and Dictamnus so far, I wonder if Burning Bush literally burns?  So I checked, lo and behold, check out this list of "HIGHLY flammable plants":
http://www.state.sc.us/forest/scplants.pdf

Burning Bush falls short of its namesake by being listed as "LESS Flammable Plants with some fire resistance", so is Pyracantha (firethorn)..., go figure!  ;D

While I jest, the topic of "Firewise Landscaping" is actually a serious one, and many States and counties put out such plant lists.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

This one is proving to be fairly interesting... Acantholimon kotschyi ssp. laxispicatum (seed collected by Pavelka from Kop Dag, Turkey, 1600m elev.), from seed in 2010 to bloom in 2011:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Nice success story Lori, the zig-zag stems are elegant, and I like the seed heads too, a second show!

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, that one was very nice!

Mark, even the common juniper (Juniperus communis) is highly flammable - or should I say inflammable ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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