Don't forget the red ones!

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15
Don't forget the red ones!

This (Antennaria dioica) is a common plant in the subalpine zone and in the lowland woods and higher up in the mountains too. You get it in different colors between red and white. The red ones are showiest.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

This  (Antennaria dioica) is a common plant in the subalpine zone and in the lowland woods and higher up in the mountains too. You get it in different colors between red and white. The red ones are showiest.

I really like Antennaria, after all, it's my namesake for my two email addresses. There are some very good species and forms, and yes, I too like the more colorful forms. One that I grow in troughs because it stays small enough, is Antennaria gaspensis (from the Gaspe peninsula, collected by George Newman), making a flat silvery ground cover, and while not showy it is interesting in flower, with blackish heads.  However, like many pussytoes (who doesn't like a plant with a cute common name like that) the flowering stems elongate and flop and entangle themselves, looking quite unkempt.  Which reminds me, time to go out with a sharp pair of snips and cut those ugly stems off before all the "fluff" starts shedding.

I had germination on one called Antennaria rosea ssp. pulvinata from NARGS seed this year, listed as cream, pink or rose, 4-17 cm.  Checking out the USDA data page on it, it has a huge array of synonym, with A. gaspensis included!  Recent taxonomic revisions have taken the approach of massive lumping.  It'll be interesting to see how it compares to A. gaspensis
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ANROP

Ooh, look at this one, Antennaria corymbosa,
Antennaria corymbosa E.E. Nelson - flat-top pussytoes
http://plants.usda.gov/java/largeImage?imageID=anco_003_ahp.jpg

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

So apparently, there is no longer a A. neglecta var. gaspensis, and A. gaspensis is A. rosea ssp. pulvinata, according to the USDA.

Personally, I like the bicolors best.

Antennaria rosea ssp. confinis

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

So apparently, there is no longer a A. neglecta var. gaspensis, and A. gaspensis is A. rosea ssp. pulvinata, according to the USDA.

Personally, I like the bicolors best.

Antennaria rosea ssp. confinis

Ooh, I like that one (A. rosea ssp. confinis), very nice :o.  So, regarding the "gaspensis" thing, if I get a nice pink-flowered plant out of the NARGS A. rosea ssp. pulvinata seed, instead of the black-and white flowered "A. gaspensis" that was collected in Gaspe, all it means is that the lumpers have done some heavy lumping.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

Quote:

One that I grow in troughs because it stays small enough, is A. gaspensis (from the Gaspe peninsula, collected by George Newman), making a flat silvery ground cover, and while not showy it is interesting in flower, with blackish heads.

My geographical knowldge is dire so I had to look up the whereabouts of the Gaspe Peninsula in wikipedia!!
Perhaps others, especially non-North American readers might have the same curiosity so here is what it told me.....

"Gaspé Peninsula  is a peninsula constituting part of the south shore of the Saint Lawrence River, in Quebec, Canada. It extends into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and is separated from New Brunswick by the baie des Chaleurs and the Restigouche River.Gaspesie is a touristic region of Quebec.

The interior is rugged, being a northward extension of the Appalachian Mountains. This range is called the Chic-Choc Mountains. A section of the International Appalachian Trail travels along the peninsula. Route 132 circles the peninsula, with one branch following the coast and the other cutting across the peninsula at Sainte-Flavie. Forillon National Park is found at the northeastern tip of the Gaspé."

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

The Gaspe Peninsula is very much like the Northern Peninsula of Newfoundland...many of the plants are indeed the same except we don't have A. rosea!  We have plenty of the brown Antennarias and a lovely one called Antennaria eucosma..the one in our BG is almost open.

In my garden red alpines are rare...here are two curently open.  Primula auricula 'Dale's Red' is truly red!  And I realize all of your Aquilegia canadensis bloomed weeks ago but mine are just starting.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Your 'Dale's Red is very red, Todd. This year I have managed to germinate lots of seed of A. canadense. I hope they are true!
I liked your black pussytoes, Mark, whether the name is this or that!
And your bicolored pussytoes, Rick, here the wild ones are either white (male plants, I am told) or red (female). I have to look out for bicolored, what kind of sex do they have?

Yesterday we had a nice trip in the mountains here (or rather the undulating "mesa". The highest point is 1200m and there were patches of snow all over. One of the few plants to flower was Loiseleuria procumbens.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Our Loiseleuria are blooming at the moment too....so Newfoundland is on par with the mountains of Scandanavia....yet our snow has been gone for 3 months....a testiment to just how cold this spring has been.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Todd wrote:

Our Loiseleuria are blooming at the moment too....so Newfoundland is on par with the mountains of Scandanavia....yet our snow has been gone for 3 months....a testiment to just how cold this spring has been.

The spring here has been colder than normal too, but not that cold!
Here's your weather forecast bay the way!
http://www.yr.no/place/Canada/Newfoundland/Saint_John%27s/hour_by_hour.html

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Thanks for the link!  Never saw this site..I now have it bookmarked.  Today actually hit 19.4 C..the warmest day so far this year...mind you it was pouring rain!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Kelaidis
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Such a heat wave, Todd! We have finally gotten into the 90's...and kinda enjoy it...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

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