Image of the day

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Hoppel
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

That Townsendia condensata is one of my favourite, the flower is 5cm in size, soft hairy leaves, fast grower in sunny very dry place, unfortunately monocarpic. I just like it - looks like a soft ball.

Michal Hoppel

Poznan

POLAND

michal@alpines.pl

www.alpines.pl

McGregorUS
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Joined: 2009-12-18

is this photograph of wild plants, or are they ones you are growing in Poland?  They are very nice - quite charming.

Malcolm McGregor
Global Moderator/NARGS Editor
East Yorkshire, UK

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

I have seeds of this one to try this year...yes it's too bad they are so short-lived.  makes for a lot of work to keep them going year to year.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Townsendia grows rather easily in the sunniest part of our Arboretum Rock Garden.  We've had no expreience with condensata at the Arboretum, though.  I think hookeri or maybe montana.  I don't know if any of our Minnesota Chapter members have tried T. condensata.  We will certainly keep it in mind!  Thanks for the photo.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoppel
Hoppel's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

McGregor wrote:

is this photograph of wild plants, or are they ones you are growing in Poland?  They are very nice - quite charming.

This is photo from my garden, plants are located under roof overhangs by my house in pure granite gravel. In regular conditions in my garden it would rot off very quickly.

Michal Hoppel

Poznan

POLAND

michal@alpines.pl

www.alpines.pl

Hoppel
Hoppel's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Boland wrote:

I have seeds of this one to try this year...yes it's too bad they are so short-lived.  makes for a lot of work to keep them going year to year.

It may be much easier to keep it going by immediate sowing. I've done it last year just after seed ripening and new seedlings shot after a couple of weeks in the same place. Now new plants are of 2cm size but probably 'll be flowering next year.

Michal Hoppel

Poznan

POLAND

michal@alpines.pl

www.alpines.pl

Booker
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Pretty plant from the Dolomites for today's image ... the gorgeous honey-scented Thlaspi rotundifolium.

THLASPI ROTUNDIFOLIUM

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

paulhschneider
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-20

Hello to all. Greetings from north central Tennessee. Pouring rain here today. Attached is one of my favorite Cornus shot at Cataract Falls, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland Summer 2007. Actually Todd it was the day my wife & I visited you in St. John's.
Great job with the website. I'm still learning how to use it ;D

Regards to all, Paul H. Schneider, Eastern Sun Studio & Gardens, Portland, TN

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Welcome to the forum, Paul!

As a kid who spent nearly every summer weekend in wild northern Minnesota near the Ontario border, I am very familiar with this species.  Back then I dismissed it as "boring", since many other more "interesting" flora abounded in the area - pitcher plants, sundews, more than a dozen species of orchids, etc.
But I have now become rather fond of Cornus canadensis, and have seen it native in a few places in southern Minnesota, too.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Cornus canadensis is perhaps THE most common woodland plant in Newfoundland...we also have Cornus suecica which is equally as nice.

Great looking Thlaspi Cliff!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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