Syneilesis

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

It only takes finding one mutation to be propagated and spread around the world, Cohan.  I don't think your observations are abnormal.  Of course, some species seem to be more prone to variegation or other mutations than others.  Even certain populations or areas of the same species can be discovered to mutated more "commonly" than others.  For instance, a disproportionate amount of dwarf and otherwise interesting forms of Canada hemlock (tree) are found in the northeast U.S.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

With the current heat wave, plants are jumping out of the ground.  Syneilesis aconitifolia appeared a couple days ago, with the umbrellas leaves opening up today... they're so cute.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, that's why you wouldn't have slug problems even with lots of slugs. The plants grow too quickly.
Very cute, I agree!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Trond, too dry for slugs here in this garden, I only ever see them when we have long bouts of rainy weather.  There's a place down the street that has small wetlands on one side, and sometimes in the mornings slugs will attempt to cross the street, but since they're so slow, by the time the sun rises and starts baking the pavement, there is a mass slug-drying ;D  I see this when I run around the neighborhood, and I have to gingerly step to avoid treading on drying slugs.  It's a fine sight indeed.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A late afternoon view of emerging S. acanthifolia, in afternoon light:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Mark, yours are at about the same stage as mine in pots.  Mine in the garden on the north side of the house have not emerged yet. S. intermedia in pots are only an inch high.

Syneilesis aconitifolia

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Today I attended our NARGS New England Chapter annual meeting and rare plant auction, and on this chilly start of a sunny new day, the event was well attended (about 40 people) and there were some very desirable one-of-a-kind plant offerings for auction.  I set my eyes on Syneilesis palmata 'Kikko'.  It was mentioned that the local nurseryman who imported this plant from Japan spent $200 for it. Bidding was spirited but I prevailed with the Syneilesis, which as it turns out, cost me the same as the Plant Delights Nursery price:
http://www.plantdelights.com/Syneilesis-palmata-Kikko-Kikko-Shredded-Umb...

I donated a nice looking plant of S. aconitifolia, which went for around $30.  Rick, a few of your S. intermedia plants would have raised a handsome sum and increased the chapter's coffers.

Syneilesis palmata 'Kikko', the net-variegated plant in the top-center:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That must be one of those plants that become more variegated as the leaves mature.  I grew a variegated forsythia (Forsythia 'Kumson') that did that. I planted seed from Syneilesis palmata 'Kikko' from the NARGS seed ex.  The first one emerged a few days ago. ;D  It's hardly done anything since it has been so cold this last week.

My Syneilesis aconitifolia are just coming up in the garden now (among our native Thalictrum thalictroides), but ones in pots have been growing for a while already.  

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

I planted seed from Syneilesis palmata 'Kikko' from the NARGS seed ex.  The first one emerged a few days ago. ;D

My Syneilesis aconitifolia are just coming up in the garden now, but one in pots have been growing for a while already.

I must have missed Syneilesis palmata 'Kikko' from the NARGS seed ex.  I was talking with NARGS members about S. aconitifolia and they mentioned that they never get viable seed.  Last year, I collected lots of seed, but never donated nor sowed the seed :rolleyes:, so it's hard for me to comment, so now I wonder about seed viability of this species.

Please show us see your results with the very-variegated 'Kikko' seedlings once they develop.  Does Syneilesis have some attraction at your local NARGS meeting plant sales, I would think they must be popular.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

From my first plantings, which were also from the NARGS seed ex, the donated seed was extremely viable - near 100% germination.  I winter sowed them in pots in late January.  I had so many that I probably threw out half of them!

Since Syneilesis only puts up one non-true leaf the first year, I wonder if variegation would show on any of the Kikko seedlings the first year.  We'll have to see....

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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