Syneilesis

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

My Syneilesis spp. haven't even poked out of the ground yet!

Then we are two, Rick! But of different reasons I assume. Here the slugs are the culprits :(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Ahhh, but they are up now, Trond.  after giving some away and donating eight at the local Chapter sale (they sold for $6 and $7 for the white or pink flower forms), I still have many left.  The one in the ground emerged a few days later, but is now farther along.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

cute things  ;D

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Ahhh, but they are up now, Trond.  after giving some away and donating eight at the local Chapter sale (they sold for $6 and $7 for the white or pink flower forms), I still have many left.  The one in the ground emerged a few days later, but is now farther along.

I planted many seedlings last year and they grew well but I haven't seen anything to them this year :'( Two plants I had in pots were fine though and I have planted them out but I don't know how long they'll survive!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Geo F-W
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Joined: 2012-02-13

I do not know if anyone here grown it, but there is a beautiful form close to S.palmata
 but, in my opinion, prettier and strong growing, S. aff. tagawae BSWJ11191 (it's a Crug Farm collected form).
She is quite tall, close to a meter, a very good plant.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Geoffrey, great seeing this one, even as an "aff." species, thanks for showing us this rarely seen species.  Checking it out on The Plant List, S. tagawae is one of 6 accepted species, never heard of it before, I see that a synonym is Syneilesis aconitifolia var. tagawae, so perhaps it is closer to S. aconitifolia.

I have never visited the Crug Farm nursery list, oh my!  Truly unique and intriguing plants, you're so lucky to have access to their offerings.  I enjoy the small genus of Syneilesis, wonderful additions to the woodland garden; I have an eye out for seed of other species.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I have not grown S. palmata, but I was under the impression that it was the real beauty of the bunch.  Your selection, Geoffrey, looks like a giant aconitifoilia, superficially at least.  I didn't know such a species existed either.  Would that be near meter high foliage or flower stalks?

Do you grow any of the other Syneilesis species?  Is the culture any different for S. aff. tagawae?

I thought that accession designation looked familiar.  Crûg Farm is the only place I have ever seen that has the real Lilium hansonii.  (Everyone thinks hansonii is yellow, but it's not.)  What a couple of very interesting (and learned) owners they must be!

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I managed to buy some plants from Crûg Farm last month but I didn't dare to buy Syneilesis as all my beautiful plants were destroyed by slugs last year :'(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Geo F-W
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Joined: 2012-02-13

Maybe it's closer to aconitifolia yes. In fact, it's like a compromise between aconitifolia and palmata : when it emerge from the ground, the leaves are well divided as an aconitifolia but the division becomes larger as a palmata...

I grow Syneilesis aconitifolia, Syneilesis palmata and its selection 'Kikko', and this one, Syneilesis tagawae.

Syneilesis aconitifolia grows well here, but I have some difficulty with palmata, which is annualy attacked by slug which are legions in the garden, despite of my vigilance...And I think that they grow in an inappropriate place, too damp, almost wet. Because they enjoy high air humidity, but grow in soil just damp. So I have to move them this spring.
I love such "umbrella" plants as Dysosma and Podophyllum, and the slugs too...

So Syneilesis tagawae grow in light shade, damp soil, humiferous, with Podophyllum, Saruma, Epimedium etc.

Crug Farm is a mecca! Sue and Bleddyn are extremely friendly. I am fortunate to have a neighbor (Thierry Delabroye, always ^^), who is friends with them and multiplies some of their plants. I wish I could go at Crug as much as I want, but Wales is not so close! And a bit isolated...There are many other British nurseries, which are small wonders for me, like Nick Macer's one, Pan Global Plants in the Gloucestershire.

Geoffrey F-Winterspoon.
Arras, Northern France, USDA zone 8 (temps min -12°c), cool and humid summer and cool winter.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/29627653@N04/sets/72157627728518944/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Geo wrote:

I love such "umbrella" plants as Dysosma and Podophyllum, and the slugs too...

So Syneilesis tagawae grow in light shade, damp soil, humiferous, with Podophyllum, Saruma, Epimedium etc.

Yes Geoffrey, there is something about "umbrella" leaved plants that adds intrique to the garden, I too like such plants.  Do you grow Diphylleia cymosa?  It's one of my favorites, great in the shady garden with adequate moisture; since I grow mine in average to at times dryish soil, it stays much smaller and manageable in such conditions, growing massive in a wet boggy situation.  The mottled brownish color of the spring leaves is a definite attraction, as are the expanding leaves, flowers, and berries.
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=253.0

I noticed Saruma henryi in some of your Epimedium photos, another of my favorite woodland plants, it is starting to seed around quite a bit too.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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