Iris suaveolens

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21
Iris suaveolens

Perhaps a little closer to natural habitat conditions, Iris suaveolens grows smaller for me than you, Mark. I don't get nearly the amount of rainfall here compared to Massachusetts, especially these last few years. In flower, the yellow form is 4-5 inches tall. The arcing of the leaves is more pronounced, too. They are evergreen even in Minnesota, and surprisingly unscathed by our winter sun in snow-wanting seasons.

I dug and divided all my I. suaveolens last summer, and they seem to not skip a beat. Bloom this spring is very ample. And although the first flowers opened April 8th, they are still blooming now.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I also grow Iris suaveolens var. rubromarginata.  There really is a thin maroon margin on the leaves, although you have to get quite close to see it.  Rubromarginata seems to grow a bit larger, 4.5-6 inches.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Buyers at our Chapter plant sale will get a treat this spring.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Perhaps a little closer to natural habitat conditions, Iris suaveolens grows smaller for me than you, Mark.  I don't get nearly the amount of rainfall here compared to Massachusetts, especially these last few years.  In flower, the yellow form is 4-5 inches tall.  The arcing of the leaves is more pronounced, too.  They are evergreen even in Minnesota, and  surprisingly unscathed by our winter sun in snow-wanting seasons.

I dug and divided all my I. suaveolens last summer, and they seem to not skip a beat.  Bloom this spring is very ample.  And although the first flowers opened April 8th, they are still blooming now.

Rick, your two forms of I. suaveolens look great, love the var. rubromarginata ones.  So, I must say that often with scale-less closeup photography, size can be deceiving.  My large clump of I. suaveolens looked great coming into the spring, but the sudden 18 degree F hard freeze after 5 or so weeks without frost, did a number on many plants, the magnolias being effected badly.  The sudden hard freeze didn't kill the flowers outright, but the plant wasn't photo-ready afterwards.  Some buds continued, and I stall have 1 flower on it today.  Measured it, and it is 4" tall, some of the other flowers may have made it to 5" tall.  So, I think our forms are similar in that respect.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Buyers at our Chapter plant sale will get a treat this spring.

Yeah, but you got em booby-trapped to give overly eager Chapter members reaching for a plant, a fist full of glochids ;D

I want to come to your chapter meetings, that's a fine lot of plants there.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

If I had a chance I would come too! I had bought a couple of the Irises, that's certain!
In Norway it is only one native Iris, I. pseudacorus. However Irises are commonly planted in gardens, mostly germanica and sibirica cultivars.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Sweet iris Rick!  I'd like to be at your sale too!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

This is all rather gratifying, and funny at the same time.  Many times I have said to myself about others' plant sales: "I wish we had plants like that at our sales."

It's the "grass is always greener on the other side" syndrome.
But I am by far the largest contributor at our sales.  I grow things to learn, not necessarily because they are pretty.
What can I say, I am a Mad Propagator.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

This is all rather gratifying, and funny at the same time.  Many times I have said to myself about others' plant sales: "I wish we had plants like that at our sales."

It's the "grass is always greener on the other side" syndrome.
But I am by far the largest contributor at our sales.  I grow things to learn, not necessarily because they are pretty.
What can I say, I am a Mad Propagator.

For me the grass is greener on the other side (of the Atlantic)! I am a member of the local Garden Society but we have nothing like your chapter sales. The nearest is a day swapping plants. Often we have identical plants to swap!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

PS! Rick, I would love to look through your boxes with plants!
Do I notice a bonsai there too?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I have a few pseudo-bonsai.  I don't have the time or patience to trim and wire roots and branches as with real bonsai.  The larch you see on the far left is about 12 years old, and excepting some wiring of the main trunk early on, the only thing I have done is pruning.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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