Fritillaria

27 posts / 0 new
Last post
Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

This frit grows very well here - until the slugs find it! I have had it several times and you can bet on it, if the slugs haven't found it before they'll find it when in full bloom! The next day all you find is a slimy mess.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A few Frits to share, the first to bloom is always F. pudica. I find it perfectly easy to grow in a reasonable well-drained loam, likes fun sun, but is growing at the base of a shrub where I think the bulbs stay dry and cooler in summer.  They have been in bloom for 2 weeks, just finishing up now and aging to a dim orange color, brightened up with scarlet lily beetles that find the plants just as the flowers fade.  I keep a small glass jar handy, and hand-pick these beasties.

Among the most reliable and charming, is F. crassifolia ssp. kurdica, only a few inches tall, with tubby waxy bells.  I have it growing in two spots, about 6 yards apart, this particular small patch always flowers well, the other planting never blooms and grows about 1/3rd the size; I believe differing soil conditions are to blame. This illustrates the importance of trying plants in different spots in the garden, it is amazing how plants can react so differently depending on microclimate.

The last is F. carica, a tiny sweet little thing, rather reminiscent of F. sibthorpiana which makes me wonder about the ID of my plants.  It is only 2-4" in flower.  Here again, in one spot is does not increase, and manages to sputter forth 1-2 tiny pale greenish yellow flared thimbles.  I tried planting some in a different location, in sandy soil, and the small clump is already much larger and spreading, with lots of small sprouting leaves at the periphery (is it stoloniferous?).  I'd like to have a larger patch of this miniature species.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

A Frit. flowering here this week:

Fritillaria affinis

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

All that I see here in this topic is satisfying, so many frits, so little time ;)  I like em all, no discrimination, I wish Lily Beetle didn't like as much as I do.  I keep a small glass jar in the garden, the receptacle of demise for hand-picked red lily beetles whenever I see them.

Here's a tiny sweetie at first time bloom, F. eastwoodiae from Northern California.  My sole little bulb came from Jane McGary in 2005, and this year it finally flowered, and I'm delighted to see the little orange thimble blooms with rolled-back petal edges.  After 6 years, it was worth the wait!

To give some sense of scale, in the following view we see a dark maroon-purple F. meleagris on the left, the petite F. eastwoodiae in the center, and on the right is Tulipa vvedenskyi from Mary Sue Ittner, perhaps my favorite tulip species.  These all grow under a Fringe Tree, Chionanthus virginicus, which is tap-rooted and very late to leaf out, thus a good tree to underplant with spring bulbs.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Another view of Fritillaria eastwoodiae, on a fine sunny day, 6 years to flowers from a small bulb.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Although we have lily beetles at my summerhouse and they can destroy lilies in a few days. But I would prefere lily beetles to slugs anytime!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Another view of Fritillaria eastwoodiae, on a fine sunny day, 6 years to flowers from a small bulb.

This species is a nice one! I am tempted to try some of the North American species now. Maybe at my summerhouse where lily beetles and deer are the enemies and not slugs!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here is a tiny Western North American native, rarely incounter in gardens. The flowers are 1/2-3/4 of an inch (1.25cm-1.90cm)across.
Fritillaria atropurpurea

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very nice, John!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Weiser wrote:

Here is a tiny Western North American native, rarely incounter in gardens. The flowers are 1/2-3/4 of an inch (1.25cm-1.90cm)across.
Fritillaria atropurpurea

John, an entrancing little native Frit.  After the S L O W success of F. eastwoodiae, I'm encouraged to try more native Fritillaria species.  What sort of conditions does F. atropurpurea enjoy?  Google and CalPhotos reveal that the flowers can come in a number of shades, but always with strong spotting; it also comes from a wide geographical area, which gives encouragement that the species would be hardy if tried here.

USDA plant profile
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=FRAT

CalPhotos:
http://calphotos.berkeley.edu/cgi/img_query?query_src=photos_index&where...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Pages

Log in or register to post comments