Corydalis solida

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Raspberry color, as it gets applied to things other than raspberry fruits themselves, refers to a range of pinkish or purplish red colors, probably from the color imparted in deserts such as raspberry sorbet, and certainly pertains to colors in clothing fashions.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raspberry_(color)

I like all three color forms Todd showed, the pink, purple, and red one (keeping it simple here).  I'd use the roll-the-eyes emoticon but it doesn't work on the NARGS forum. :P

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
Boland's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

Reddish-violet or wine might be the correct colour...mind you locals call it raspberry....guess its because homemade raspberry jam can be dark...maybe we Newfoundanders are all colour-blind!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

externmed
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-03-01

Woodland conditions?
I moved some C. solida from a semi-shady area to raised bed exposed to full sun.  I think the are increasing (in size), but they look really unhappy about May 15-20 when we get a day in the upper 80s(F) and promptly disappear underground. 

So, full sun vs dappled shade any thoughts?

Thanks,
Charles Swanson Massachusetts USA
(for whatever reason, and whatever pollinates them, so far I get little or no seed set in full sun)

NE Massachusetts (New England) USA  zone 6 (5B to 6B)

gardens visited, photographs:  www.flickr.com/photos/wildmeadow

IMYoung
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-31

externmed wrote:

Woodland conditions?
I moved some C. solida from a semi-shady area to raised bed exposed to full sun.   I think the are increasing (in size), but they look really unhappy about May 15-20 when we get a day in the upper 80s(F) and promptly disappear underground.  

So, full sun vs dappled shade any thoughts?

Thanks,
Charles Swanson Massachusetts USA
(for whatever reason, and whatever pollinates them, so far I get little or no seed set in full sun)

Charles, if your Corydalis solida are flowering before  "they look really unhappy about May 15-20 when we get a day in the upper 80s(F) and promptly disappear underground"  then although the very warm weather may be accelerating their departure before they have a chance to set seed, it is certainly the case that these Corydalis do not hang around long in any climate.
It is one of their prime attractions as a plant for "high-rise" or "multi-storey " planting in our garden that theyis growinfg season IS so short, allowing them to be grown   in the same area of ground as  lots of other plants  with differing growth cycles/times to allow maximum use of space.  In the wild also, these are plants which emerge quickly in Spring, grow , flower, set seed and die back, all in a remarkably short time.

This is a feature often highlighted in Ian's Bulb Logs .... see http://www.srgc.org.uk/logs/index.php?log=bulb for all these from 2003.... there is an Index, too-  http://www.srgc.org.uk/bulblog/index.pdf

Regards,
M

Ian  and/or Margaret Young ( -here it is usually Margaret)

Aberdeen , North East Scotland, UK
Zone 8a

www.srgc.net

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

three of my corydalis in flower at the moment

Corydalis parnassica
Corydalis solida
Corydalis sp from Caucusus

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Very nice plants, Tony! Do you prefere light colors? It is still some week till I can enjoy mine.....

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Paul T
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Beautiful, everyone.

This species struggles for me here unfortunately.  I think it is the heat.  I think I'm going to have to try to set up a microclimate and get them going as I just love the ones I've seen in person.  Not been successful as yet, but I live in hope and keep trying them whenever I can find them to buy.  I live in hope.  ;D

Thanks for the inspirational pics..... that red (or whatever colour) form is beautiful in particular and i love anything in purple.  Thanks again. 8)

Cheers.

Paul T.
Canberra, Australia.
Min winter temp -8 or -9°C. Max summer temp 40°C. Thankfully, maybe once or twice a year only.

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Hoy wrote:

Very nice plants, Tony! Do you prefere light colors? It is still some week till I can enjoy mine.....

No these are just the first in flower! I have some nice deep red ones and a lovely white which are just reaching their best. i do not like the straggly asian ones which a lot of people rave about and do not grow any

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

three more of my Corydalis solida. The white one from Mt Vermion in Greece I particularly like. They are all that colour and occur in thousands on the mountain.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Tony wrote:

three more of my Corydalis solida. The white one from Mt Vermion in Greece I particularly like. They are all that colour and occur in thousands on the mountain.

All are beauties Tony, although I'm with you on your favorite, the compact white one from Greece is outstanding.  What's so interesting about your profile images, is that we get to see the plant's full habit... nothing wrong with any of them, but I do love the compact habit and pristine white flowers of Mt. Vermion Greece one.  Under garden condition, it can be near impossible to capture these types of profile photos, so your most excellent photos are a great educational gauge of species and cultivars that might otherwise seem similar.  Thanks for feasting our eyes!  It should be 2-3 week before we see similar Corydalis shows here.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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