Narcissus cyclamineus

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
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Joined: 2009-12-15
Narcissus cyclamineus

I have several cultivars of Narcissus but this species Narcissus cyclamineus is among the best of the genus. It is easy from seed.

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

They do very well near Portland, Oregon.  And they self-sow readily here.  They start blooming in Feb-March, so it's amazing that they get pollinated.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I just happened to be talking with some members of the Minnesota Daffodil Society today.  They tell me that none of the species narcissus are reliably hardy here. They had some nice miniatures on display, but they keep them in a cold frame or other protected locale for the winter.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

I have several cultivars of Narcissus but this species Narcissus cyclamineus is among the best of the genus. It is easy from seed.

Trond, that's a cute one to be sure.  I had a couple of tiny Narcissus species, but lost all but one from an encroaching Rhododendron; I need to salvage and move the last non-flowering bulbs, and a non-flowering Juno Iris aucheri (it used to flower when it had more sun), to a more open sunny spot. 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

There has not been much easy opportunity to try species narcissus here... bulbs for purchase, I mean.  (I don't think I have the patience to grow them from seed... although if N. cyclamineus is easy and relatively quick from seed...)  N. poeticus is hardy here - I know of other people growing it too.  I tried N. tazetta 'Canaliculatus' a couple of times with no wintering success, though.  Should make an effort to try others, I suppose.

Rick, I assume those folks do likely find many of the hybrids and miniature hybrids hardy, though?  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Skulski wrote:

There has not been much easy opportunity to try species narcissus here... bulbs for purchase, I mean.  (I don't think I have the patience to grow them from seed... although if N. cyclamineus is easy and relatively quick from seed...)  N. poeticus is hardy here - I know of other people growing it too.  I tried N. tazetta 'Canaliculatus' a couple of times with no wintering success, though.  Should make an effort to try others, I suppose.

Cyclamineus is easy!
I have got seed from HPS (Hardy Plant Society, UK) and RHS (Royal Horticultural Society, UK). They germinate quickly and reach flowering size i 2-3 years.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Boland
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-09-25

We have narcissus fly in St. John's so most narcissus are only annuals for us unless you fuss.  I do have a few that seem to survive the onslaught.  Topolino is the only mini that seems to survive...might be open in the next week or two.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

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