Jeffersonia

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Cleaning up around a clump of Jeffersonia dyphylla, I thought I'd clear around the plump resting buds to reveal them, normally just barely visible unless the top layer of leaf mold and soil is scratched away.  Also seen, is a fine network of roots.  After the photo, the buds were recovered for a safe winter rest.  Trond, maybe these types of leaf buds would not last in your area if they're attractive to slugs.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Rick and Mark
Just seen your postings above and it's solved a mystery for me .
I grow Jeffersonia dubia ,(it is currently forming about 6 good sized seed pods--if you are still after fresh seed Gene just PM me ),however i have raised seed  of something a bit different...

Seeing your pics it's obviously J.diphylla , a newy for moi  ;D .Unfortunately i have no idea where the seed came from. :rolleyes:

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I would agree Dave, looks like Jeffersonia diphylla to me too.  It will fit in nicely with your trillium collection.  When it does flower (will take several years from seed), be sure to watch the buds closely, the flowers are fleeting and may only last but 1 day (in warm temperature) or up to 3-4 days with cool weather.  Even so, this is an excellent plant.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Cleaning up around a clump of Jeffersonia dyphylla, I thought I'd clear around the plump resting buds to reveal them, normally just barely visible unless the top layer of leaf mold and soil is scratched away.  Also seen, is a fine network of roots.  After the photo, the buds were recovered for a safe winter rest.  Trond, maybe these types of leaf buds would not last in your area if they're attractive to slugs.

Mark, fortunately I haven't seen slug damage of the only specimen I have of a Jeffersonia. But who knows - sometime a precocious slug find it irresistible.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Abnormally warm weather has brought about particularly early bloom in the garden, and in just a few days Jeffersonia have gone from no visible signs of sprouting to being in flower.  Today however is cold and dreary, so the first flowers are closed tightly.  I hope the predicted deep freezing nights for the next several nights doesn't do too much damage.

Jeffersonia diphylla was way behind J. dubia in emerging, but it caught up, to flower at the same time.

Left:  from a previous year's in-situ seed sowing of Jeffersonia dubia in a large patch of ground, are seedlings entering their second year of growth just emerging.
Right: from 2011 seed sowing of 5 flats of Jeffersonia dubia, they're all coming up thickly, as are 2 flats of J. diphylla.  In  the photo, the first seedlings showing, many many more are just breaking surface (can't see that in the photo) and others still germinating and pushing the soil surface upward.  Taking no risk, I'm bringing the flats inside for 3-4 days until the temperatures moderate.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Great to see your Jeffersonia so advanced, Mark.   Can't wait to see those pristine buds open.  (And look at that beautiful trillium in the background too.)

You'll need to watch it, though - they're practically getting to be weeds.   ;D ;D  

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Wow-- looking great! Hope the they weather the freeze okay..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

My Jeffersonia diphylla buds with leaves, but Jeffersonia dubia does not.  Is that normal for you, Mark, or is it the weird weather?

       

J. diphylla is just emerging...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hmmm, interesting.  My J. dubia tend to show buds first but quickly by the time buds are ready to open there are young leaves, so I have always thought it as having simultaneous bud/leaf growth.  Could be that the extra warmth this spring is causing aberrant behavior, shooting buds up before leaves have had a chance. But my goodness, look at all them buds, going to be quite a sight soon.

Rick, do you get germination with the seed?  I'm always surprised that this plant is so expensive to purchase, when they make so much seed and seem very easy to germinate and grow on.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

Great to see your Jeffersonia so advanced, Mark.   Can't wait to see those pristine buds open.  (And look at that beautiful trillium in the background too.)

You'll need to watch it, though - they're practically getting to be weeds.   ;D ;D  

Well, I'm hoping to replace much of my lawn with Jeffersonia ;D  The trillium in the background is T. foetidissimum; I have several different ones, they are among the earliest to bud up.

Cohan and others, I hope to report back next weekend after the freezing weather, to see what transpires.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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