Jeffersonia

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Jeffersonia are awakening, ready to flower.  A bit too overcast, cold and windy for the blooms to open, but maybe in another day or two.  On the left is J. diphylla with ephemeral emergence in fleshy red-purple tones, and on the right, the Korean form of J. dubia with even deeper ruddiness and rich lavender flowers held closed from the cold.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Beautiful, Mark, both of them!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

Beautiful, Mark, both of them!

Thanks Trond, these are nice plants that I'm particularly fond of.  I also like their early flowering, blooming at the same time as Corydalis solida and Pulmonarias, both of which have started.

A few more views on this relatively mild sunny (but windy) early spring day, a State holiday in Massachusetts (Patriot's Day, and the running of the Boston Marathon).  Thought I'd share a few more photos, as I have to wait until next weekend to see them again.

Two views of the Korean form of J. dubia, in the second photo you get a peek at the red ovaries (typically they are yellowish green).

Two view of regular J. dubia, although my plants came from a friend and nearby gardener Marsha Russell, who had some darker colors. Today, the first flowers actually opened.

A small grouping of Jeffersonia diphylla in my woods.  I fear I shall miss their fleeting 1-3 day bloom period this year, now that I'm back to working.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Gorgeous, Mark!
I'm a latecomer to awareness of these plants, but find them very charming indeed!

On the subject of spring ephemerals, does anyone know of a seed source for this sort of thing? (woodlanders, spring things etc) Kristl has some ephemerals, and we know her methods are reliable..... any others that aren't simply people selling seed of doubtful validity in fall/winter?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

If you have some surplus seed, Mark.........

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I typically have lots of seed of both species; happy to share moist-packed seed which must be sown upon receipt.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Howey
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-05-17

Hi Mark:  Could you please add my name to the list for Jeffersonia dubia seed?  I too have J. diphylla and have been admiring its slow motion and eye catching emergence and will probably have plenty of seeds to give away when the time comes.  I expect J.dubia seed could be planted nearby - would have same requirements as to soil and exposure?  Fran Howey
Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Howey wrote:

Hi Mark:  Could you please add my name to the list for Jeffersonia dubia seed?  I too have J. diphylla and have been admiring its slow motion and eye catching emergence and will probably have plenty of seeds to give away when the time comes.  I expect J.dubia seed could be planted nearby - would have same requirements as to soil and exposure?  Fran Howey
Frances Howey
London, Ontario, Canada
Zone 5b

Sure thing Fran.  And yes, the two species like similar habitat, although the American J. diphylla will sail through more drought than J. dubia.  I haven't lost any J. dubia to drought, but the leaves tend to collapse much more easily in dry weather than diphylla.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

I typically have lots of seed of both species; happy to share moist-packed seed which must be sown upon receipt.

;D ;D ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Gene Mirro
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-25

I planted some J. dubia seed from the NARGS (received 1/11, lot #1694) on 3/20/11 in an unheated greenhouse.  This was moist-packed seed.  It is germinating now (4/21/11).  I did not give it an initial warm period.  I assumed the moist packing took care of that.  Temperatures varied from 32F at night to 70F during the day.

This seed has very erratic germination.  I have some that are germinating two years after being sown.  It may have something to do with whether the seed has been dried.

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

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