Jeffersonia

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Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

2' tall? My Jeffersonia never exceeds 1/2'!
These leaves are very different from anything I have seen (but I haven't seen much of Jeffersonia!). It seems to be moist where they grow?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

2' tall? My Jeffersonia never exceeds 1/2'!
These leaves are very different from anything I have seen (but I haven't seen much of Jeffersonia!). It seems to be moist where they grow?

It was very moist (wet in places) in George Newman's garden, yet his Jeffersonia clones only reached 12" or so.  My plant that reaches 24" tall is growing in dry open woodland under moisture-wicking sugar maples.  There is lots of genetic differences in leaf size, shape, and plant height; little has been done about selecting different forms although I know of one start-up nursery that has two J. diphylla selections on their list (but because their list was "provisional" or a preview, I'm not allowed to divulge).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

It was very moist (wet in places) in George Newman's garden, yet his Jeffersonia clones only reached 12" or so.  My plant that reaches 24" tall is growing in dry open woodland under moisture-wicking sugar maples.  There is lots of genetic differences in leaf size, shape, and plant height; little has been done about selecting different forms although I know of one start-up nursery that has two J. diphylla selections on their list (but because their list was "provisional" or a preview, I'm not allowed to divulge).

Interresting! I have always thought of Jeffersonia as rather small plants with size like Hepaticas!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I have received fresh seed of the white form of Jeffersonia dubia, which is being grown and shown in the UK, and with luck, I'll get germination and in a few years have this gorgeous white form here in the USA.

http://www.srgc.org.uk/smf/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=5303.0;attach...

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

That is something to crave!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Woodard
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-11-29

Fascinating discussion and photos! I look forward to updates on these seed projects. Though out of season, here are some photos of J. dubia. They were taken this past spring at Hantaek Botanical Garden, an hour or two southwest of Seoul.

Joseph Woodard, just west of Nashville, TN. USDA zone 6b, but more like 7 or so in recent years.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Joseph wrote:

Fascinating discussion and photos! I look forward to updates on these seed projects. Though out of season, here are some photos of J. dubia. They were taken this past spring at Hantaek Botanical Garden, an hour or two southwest of Seoul.

Gorgeous Jeffersonia clumps there.  Do you have more photos of Korean plants to share with us on the forum sometime?  During the winter months, or any time for that matter, it is perfectly fine to show plants not current with the date of posting.  Do you grow both Jeffersonia species in Tennessee?  I'm sure J. diphylla is native where you are, have you found much variation in this species?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Joseph wrote:

Fascinating discussion and photos! I look forward to updates on these seed projects. Though out of season, here are some photos of J. dubia. They were taken this past spring at Hantaek Botanical Garden, an hour or two southwest of Seoul.

This is exactly what I want in my garden. How do I accomplish that??

And I join Mark, I am ready to digest more pictures from Korea.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hoy wrote:

This is exactly what I want in my garden. How do I accomplish that??

And I join Mark, I am ready to digest more pictures from Korea.

Trond, I believe the seed is ephemeral and needs moist packing.  I sent seed to people in the UK (small moist packed), I could send some next year in the spring 2011 harvest, but you'll have to remind me. :D

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

McDonough wrote:

Hoy wrote:

This is exactly what I want in my garden. How do I accomplish that??

And I join Mark, I am ready to digest more pictures from Korea.

Trond, I believe the seed is ephemeral and needs moist packing.  I sent seed to people in the UK (small moist packed), I could send some next year in the spring 2011 harvest, but you'll have to remind me. :D

Very kind of you, Mark. I don't think I'll forget to remind you!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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