Eritrichium howardii

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Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

That is gorgeous.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Looks good in a pot too ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mikkelsen
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-09-04

Brian_W wrote:

Greetings,

E. howardii is one of the most common plants where I live in Western Montana.  Virtually every limestone outcrop is covered with them.

Fantastic!  What a glorious gem!

Margin of the Great Basin Desert & Wasatch Mountains
4350' (1326m) Elevation; Zone 5a - 7a; 5 miles from the
climate moderating effects of The Great Salt Lake, Utah
J. Mikkelsen

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Eritrichium howardii seems to have wintered over well!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Peden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-04

Eritrichium howardii in bloom. I recently fed this African Violet food (high in P) as part of its regime hoping to get a truly pumped up specimen. This may be risky down the line and I'm not sure it makes a big difference on bud set -timing still undetermined.

The Bighorn Mountains plant got the same dose. It actually had two blossoms at about the time I dosed it. Now it is definitely "out of character". I think this not necessarily bad for plants growing in the (relative) greenhouse that is the northeastern garden. Precise conditions/feed will do this wonders but perhaps I won't!

Eritrichium from the Wallowa. No intention of blooming. Ever? Note the minuscule bug at right in the photo: It is a pest of these; eating flowers and perhaps pollen. Mmmmm....blue candy....

Eritrichium  from the Lemhi Mountains: Oops! Hope Y'all didn't go up onto the land of eternal winter in search of the rare Eritrichium with the tiny leaves. The Drabas got me! This wouldn't be the first time a small collection packet (of mine) had more than one species put into it. Good odds that this extremely tiny growing Draba came from up there in August winter.

Bundraba!

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Michael, do keep us up to date on your fertilizing experiment.  I've never had the nerve to try it with this plant.  My big eritrichium news is that E. howardii has made two new seedlings.  I'll try taking a photo with a zoom.  The seedling from two years ago is still there in a piece of tufa but no blooms yet.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Okay, it wintered over and I see lots of buds tucked into those little rosettes... crossing my fingers...  ;)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lori, it looks like a winner to be.  Mine didn't flower as well as last year but since it made seedlings it can be forgiven anything.  The others didn't flower at all but look good.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Seems Eritrichums are the ultimate plant for a dedicated gardener to keep alive during the winter! Then I wont try - not at home anyway - but maybe I'll give them (and me) a chance at my mountain cabin! They are great plants ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

The start of bloom, with many, many more buds to go!  (I'll try not to be too big of a nuisance with these photos...  :D)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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