What do you see on your garden walks 2014?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Cockcroft wrote:

"Anemone canadensis, which I have still not got rid of (this year, maybe);"

Good luck on that one, Lori.  Anemone canadensis showed up one year and looked so lovely in the seed pot that I planted it out, not knowing what it was.  Five years later, I finally dug the last of it out.  Round-up is not a product I use in the garden but I made an exception in the case of R. canadensis.  Its thread-like roots sprout at every node.  That's a shame, because it's a beautiful brute.

Yeah, isn't it?   Mine showed up on its own too.  Given that it's out in the hell strip (dry, lousy soil) between the fence and the sidewalk, it was even rather nice for a while having something that was happy to grow there.  At the same time, I'm a huge sap for letting it stay because I knew it was wildly invasive... no one's fault but mine.

By "getting rid of it", I really meant "starting the multi-year war against it and, possibly, eventually, by devoting every weekend to it, getting rid of it somewhere within my lifetime", LOL!    

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Dactylorhiza, Eremurus and Epipactis are all doing very nicely this year. Credit goes to our warm moist springtime, smiley

 

                               

 

                               

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

There are advantages to being a lazy weeder

I was weeding yesterday and found two Saruma henryi seedlings: the only two I've ever seen.  I don't know that I would have noticed them, had I not let them grow to a recognizable age.  They aren't anywhere near the parent plant.  They have an interesting growth pattern. 

                               

There are two glabrous cotyledons, then two hair oval leaves (juvenile leaves?) that at least appear to be arranged opposite.  And then growth explodes with the true leaves and form.

                    

 

Iris graminea and friends, Thalictrum aquilegifolium, Pulmonaria 'Silver Streams', Gentiana tibetica, Lilium michiganense, Impatiens glandulifera, lots of weeds.

                     

Abelia mosanensis  is hardy here with a most wonderful fragrance.

Back on June 5, I found this caterpillar on Antennaria rosea subsp. pulvinata (formerly Antennaria neglecta var. gaspensis according to Flora of North America).  It was 3 mm long and produced a strong web "roof" for protection as it lived in the growing points.

                                    

 

          

It has turned out to be a Vanessa sp.  June 19, it is now 4 cm.  Surprisingly, they have not done much damage at all to the plants.  It makes me wonder what they are eating!

         

 

 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Longma wrote:

Dactylorhiza, Eremurus and Epipactis are all doing very nicely this year. Credit goes to our warm moist springtime, smiley

 

Nice, Ron! I have two or three orchids in flower now but the dry weather isn't to their liking so I don't show them!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, the Saruma seeds are probably dispersed by ants?

I don't like caterpillars in my flower bed so usually I kill them as soon as I see them - except those I recognize as butterfly larvae.

Have a lot of butterflies in the garden now - when the wind isn't too strong. The warm and dry weather seems to be to favored by them as long as they have food.

 

The Kiwi plant (Actinidia deliciosa) also seems to like the weather. I have never seen so many flower so early in the year! Hard to picture though - high above my head and hidden in the foliage.

 

 

Another blue Corydalis is in flower in the shade of the shrubs.

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hoy wrote:

Rick, the Saruma seeds are probably dispersed by ants?

I've always wanted to check that out with the saruma seed... if they have elaiaosomes or not.  But I've only gotten this far...

This is fun: Astragalus sp., wild seed from Utah.

More stuff in the garden:

Coryphantha vivipara - flowers bloom for two to two and a half days.

23 June

                    

24 June

                    

Thalictrum dasycarpum, male and female.

                    

Not sure if this is significant, but on my plants, there is  a difference in foliage: male and female.

                   

Penstemon cobaea

                    

Penstemon cyananthus

                    

Saxifraga crustata hybrid, Aquilegia saximontana, Symphyandra armena (or Campanula....)

        

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

From Western China Notholirion bulbiferum

 

                         

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Longma wrote:

From Western China Notholirion bulbiferum

Very nice Ron .

 

Shot out yesterday for a quick trip to Maple Glen ,a 25 acre private garden, to view the their Galanthus display .Although peak flowering will be towards the end of the month I managed to find a few clumps in bloom.

     

 

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Ah yes, I can just barely make out a few in bloom there... LOL!  Looks wonderful!  

Spring again in your part of the world and the start of summer here.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Lori S. wrote:

Ah yes, I can just barely make out a few in bloom there... LOL!  Looks wonderful!  

Spring again in your part of the world and the start of summer here.

laugh

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

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