Argentina, December 2013

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Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27
Argentina, December 2013

Trond Hoy and I joined 8 others for a rosulate viola tour from Bariloche to Chos Malal this month.  I'll kick off the tour notes with a view of Cerro Catedral, with Viola sacculus, Oxalis erythrorhiza, and Ranunculus semiverticillatus.  Viola sacculus Viola sacculus

Oxalis erythrorhiza  Ranunculus semiverticillatus Ranunculus semiverticillatus

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

What a start!!!   Magnificent.  More please.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Saori
Saori's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-10-10

Welcome back Claire! Wow, these pictures are awesome! Looking forward to hearing about your trip.

P.S. We had a big party at your place while you were gone. I didn't know that Ron could limbo so well! cheeky

 

From the beautiful Pacific Northwest, USA,
where summer is mild and dry but winter is dark and very wet... USDA Zone 7b or 8 (depends on the year)

 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Fabulous pics Claire, can't wait to see more.  Of all the amazing rosulate violets I've seen, I can say with some confidence that I adore Viola sacculus the most, such pristine flowery rosettes.  And what's not to love about pulvinate Oxalis and ridiculously awesome ranunculi,  In the Cerro Catedral mountain views, the rock looks particularly knarly and pointed.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Stunning!  Thanks for posting, Claire.  I'm looking forward to seeing more of this trip from you and Trond.  It must have been a surprise to run into someone you "knew" in such an exotic place!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

The second day's outing was led by the incomparable Marcela Ferreyra to Pilcaniyeu.  She started the plant hunt by finding Viola volcanica, a very tiny brown bun.  Junellias and anathrophyllum provided "wow" factors, with gamocarpha and nastanthus looking very alien.  Viola escondidaensis lived up to its epithet (escondido means hidden) by nestling in grasses and small shrubs.

Viola volcanica  Viola volcanica

Junellia sp.   Junellia sp.   Junellia sp.  Maybe Trond can tell us the species names?

Anarthrophyllum strigulipetalum   Anarthrophyllum strigulipetalum

Gamocarpha selliana   Nastanthus patagonicus

Viola escondidaensis   Viola escondidaensis

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Brilliant. Many more please.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Hi Claire! Thanks for a nice tour! You were a comfortable companion on the trip.

I have just gotten some spare time after going to work Monday morning (arrived at home Sunday evening).

 

Regarding the Junellia, I am not sure of the species (we saw so many different of them that it got a bit difficult) but I think it possibly was J. minutifolia at that place.

Here are a few more:

On our way back from the day's excursion.        An Azorella (monantha(?)) making a dense carpet. Nasanthus patagonicus and the bus.                  

    

 

We found several orchids. Here is Chloraea cylindrostachya.                                      Hypochoeris incana.

   

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-07-02

Boy oh boy.yes

Wonderful plants and superbly captured Claire and Trond.

South America is at the top of my bucket list that's for sure.

Thanks for posting.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

The pea family was represented by several genera (more later), here are a couple of Astragalus palenae(?) colour versions.

The genus Calceolaria was diverse and ubiquitous. Here is Calceolaria polyrhiza. (Some of the names may be wrong as it was a plethoria of similarlooking plants!)

 

  

 

Haplopappus prunelloides.                        Another Junellia, maybe Junellia succulentifolia(?).

    

 

Olsynium junceum with a hoverfly.           Sisyrynchium macrocarpum

    

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

Hi, Trond!  I'm glad to see your posts!

Folks, if you want to have a tour with plenty of laughs, just spend 3 weeks with two very funny Norwegians (Trond and Oysten).  They were always fast with the quips and very clever.

Oh, and the Ron that Saori mentioned is Ron Ratko, who usually takes care of my house and my two silly terriers while I'm away.  He held a couple of seed packaging parties at my house while I was gone for the NARGS seed exchange (but no limbo, he assures me).  Good work, everyone!

How's this for a Christmas tree?     Chloraea cylindrostachya   Chloraea cylindrostachya

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

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