What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

cohan wrote:

Trond, is that the natural spacing of the trees on that slope, or is that due to grazing?

The spacing is natural as the grazing is at a very low level these days. When my father in law was a kid no trees grew here at all. Changing climate and lack of grazing (and cheese-making; cooking milk to make cheese needs a lot of firewood) have resulted in a treeline creeping higher and higher.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting changes.. apparently, treeline- or at least woody growth- is climbing in our mountains as well, threatening wildflower meadows...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It is  shrubby areas with dwarf birch and heather which is occupied by conifers, the meadows are threatened by birch invasion (not that that is any better!).

 

Rick, I like that Acer miyabei! Looks interesting.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Not all Acer miyabei have the corky bark.  In fact, when I first bought the ungrafted tree mail order and 3 feet high in 1996, it had smooth bark.  The first winter it died back to the ground, and the next summer when it grew back it had corky bark.  What a pleasant surprise!  As all Asian maples are, it is susceptible to verticillium wilt, which is native here, and it was atacked when it was 15-20 ft tall.  Since then, I'v been growing it as a shrub that I cut down every 2-3 years.  It has no fall color for me, either, so I can't allocate my limited space for such an iffy tree.  But the bark and deep, deep green foliage is so nice, so I keep it around.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Rick, I have no problem with verticillium wilt so far and I think I will be on the look-out for this fine species maple.

Winter is approaching, we are expecting freezing temps next week, the first so far this fall! Some plants are still in flower. Here are som pics from last week (the plants look the same today!)

 

A late flowering Japanese Anemone cultivar is still sparsely flowering. Cyclamen hederifolium among fallen maple leaves.

 

 

A yellow fruited holly with good crop this year. Rosa 'Flammentanz' with a late flush of blooms.

    

 

This Fascicularia bicolor is flowering for the first time. It is in a pot that I bring inside when it is too cold outside.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice to see the colour- Fascicularia is interesting- I'\d hav e to look it up, no idea what it is- looks  like a bromeliad?

Our colours are now reduced to shades of gray and mostly white! snowing again today, we have mid-winter amounts on the ground now...  this is one of the rock gardens in front of the house the other night... more snow since then..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Been a while since I've had a look at the Forum - busy through the summer in the garden and nursery. Still good autumn colours here with Cornus controversa 'Variegata' just going over, and Magnolia x loebneri 'Leonard Messel'. The second picture shows our small sand bed in the front garden with winter protection from excess rains half constructed. This allows quite a few more tricky plants to get through the winter in the absence of much snow cover - must give passers by something to wonder about!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Seems to have missed the first picture?

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I fixed it for you, Tim.  The photo had been uploaded but not yet "inserted" into the text.  If you go back to your message and click on "Edit", you can see what I mean - note the "Insert" button.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Thanks Lori - need to get used to this new Forum!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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