North American Columbines - starting with Aquilegia saximontana

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Peden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-04

I have several Aquilegia jonesii blossoms coming on over two dozen plants. These are pretty well ahead of any other columbine in the garden. I think I'd have more fun crossing them with (the next) A. canadensis than letting them make more A. jonesii. Thoughts? Anyone in New York, Vermont, or Massachusettes have the Canada columbine in bloom and what would come of pollen (or flowers) shipped in mail? Any info on this cross?

Last year I had one late bloom on A. jonesii, the first I've ever seen (woo hoo!). I dabbed with pollen from a late flower on one of the small (European) blue ones. This either worked or the plant selfed; there were forty seeds in one pod! I scuffed them into a prepared spot and wait to see if they are good.

I do have one early bud on A. canadensis at a very warm site so I'm thinking the A gods and I might be coming into alignment. Anyway....

One final note: The oldest plant on my garden is among those coming into bloom (one big flower on a single mangy rosette). This came from seed collected in 2004. It has alternated from possibly alive to nearly dead (with obvious exception of this season). It has certainly outlived any other columbine in the garden.

Maybe I'll find a warm hillside to scour today.....

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Bundraba! wrote:

I think I'd have more fun crossing them with (the next) A. canadensis than letting them make more A. jonesii. Thoughts?

My thought would be that a few generations of garden A. jonesii might produce a garden amenable strain for the rest of us. ;D

But a cross of anything with A. jonesii would be interesting, too.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Just having these plants in the garden, and growing on seedlings, one is apt to end up with hybrids, unless as Michael stated, no other Aquilegia are in bloom nearby.

I got the following plant as Aquilegia desertorum (.50 cents at a local NARGS chapter seedling sale, seed from AGS 08-09). It's a lovely plant, with foliage that looks like the right species, the flowers clearly indicate a hybrid (see link below showing the bright red conical shape of the flowers). Typically I don't opt for Aquilegia seed that has been garden collected, much rather get wild collected seed, but for half a buck, I thought I'd try it.  I really like the "parsley" foliage, rather distinctive and firm to the touch, and pretty flowers on rather tall stems (2').
http://www.swflora.com/aquiligea.html

Aquilegia desertorum hybrid, flowers and foliage from 2012:

foliage now, 4-21-2013:

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Does the Columbine leaf miner go after it?

They tend not to bother A. canadensis too much, but seem to like all the other (mostly non-American) species I've tried.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Haven't really paid attention to the leaf-miner thing, but from the first foliage photo (2012), some leaves appear to have leaf miner damage.  I'll pay more attention this year.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Peden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-04

These are coming fast. It looks like the better bet might be the cross canadensis x jonesii. Cold dry sunny days and
arctic nights are not speeding the A. canadensis along.
   

Michael Peden 4-23-13

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Congratulations on blooming those sweet little puppies, really tiny and beautiful. 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Peden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-04

Thanks Mark; I need to keep working.... a smattering of the pink form of Androsace carnea as well as little drabas scattered about in cheery yellow; plus I need to keep those Aquilegias going!

Michael Peden
Lake Champlain Valley, zone 4b
Four and a half months frost free
Snow cover not guaranteed

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

I have five good seedlings in the greenhouse from supposed Aquilegia saximontana seed from one of the UK Exchanges. I thought I might try a couple in a trough and spread the others in odd corners of the garden. I suppose they will start their dormant period soon and die down, or should I try to keep them in growth?

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Gee, I didn't know this would even be a question!

 

  I've never had any Aquilegia go dormant before the season closes, although I haven't grown many of the alpine ones.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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