What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Sisyrinchium montanum is a beautiful wildflower that can get quite full and robust in the garden (much moreso than is typical in nature)... this is not the best example (though it was the best picture!)  The petals become recurved in full bloom and in full sun.

Dracocephalum nutans; Veronica austriaca var. teucrium;  Hedysarum boreale... which I was surprised to find is very pleasantly fragrant!

     

Geranium sanguineum... lots of these throughout the yard, and they are welcome!

 

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Here we are in the Dolomites and we woke up this morning to a pea soup fog (I thought).  Actually, it's snowing!  So far not sticking to the road but sticking to everything else.  It will be  a change of plans for today.

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Well, that's the mountains for you, Anne!   ;-)   I hope it clears up soon though so you can enjoy those views.  Please do post photos!  I would love to see them.  I'm not sure how our hiking plans will play out this summer with so many bridges washed out on the highways in to the mountain parks (a minor complaint, needless to say, compared to the situations of those who have suffered flood damage to their homes, though).

A few things from the yard, in the first burst of bloom on the perennials:

Iris versicolor; Echium russicum (soundly perennial here); Silene uniflora (x2) - pinkish and white among the self-seeded multitudes:

         

Silene zawadskii (x2) - I love this plant!  It's tough as nails and takes all conditions.

   

Anemone canadensis... horribly invasive but tough and beautiful.  I thought I'd finally get rid of it this year but now I'm wavering again... as it silently invades under the plastic barrier, past the fence line and into the inner yard... 

Update on mountain lily, Ixiolirion tataricum:

Hemerocallis flava - very fragrant:

The start of bloom on Verbascum x phoenicium:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I don't have any constantly moist areas in my yard.  In the wild, Styrax americanus grows in the flood plains, but it does okay here, too.  This exceptionally rainy spring has produced flowers that are 50% larger than usual.  This shrubby little American Snowbell is from a disjunct population in Illinois, at the northernmost site of its geographic distribution.

         

 

Abelia mosanensis - nice fragrance

         

 

A Hemerocallis sp., Coryphantha vivipara.  My two Agave parryi from Flagstaff, AZ didn't make it through the winter here.  (Photo taken in April.)  I'll try again under the rainshadow of the house roof.

                   

 

Phyteuma orbiculare

                   

 

Gladiolus atroviolaceus .  And this will be a good year for Verbascum nigrum.

     

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Every year is a good year for Verbascum nigrum in my yard! ;-)  (I'm always thinning out the self-seeded hordes... I do love to have it around, nonetheless.)  I'm also struck by how much more advanced your season is compard to ours... V. nigrum is weeks from blooming here.  

I've not yet had any success at wintering over the hardy gladiolas, unfortunately, so very  well done, Rick!

Rosa spinosissima is spectacular right now and very fragrant (funny, I didn't used to notice the fragrance from it) - the bees are having a lovely time in it:

   

Eremurus himalaicus;  Athamanta turbith ssp. haynaldii - does this thing have a common name?

    

View from below of Caragana arborescens 'Walker' on a high graft (DH likes to refer to this as "the acacia" - yes, he does know better!!!)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

May i say you do have some beautiful plants Lori, grown beautifully.

Your Eremurus himalaicus is looking superb. We have a number of Eremurus sp. in the garden and are very keen to add more. Unfortunately, although they grow each year and seem healthy enough, they stubbornly refuse to flower. Any cultivation tips would be very much appreciated. :-)

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thank you, Ron!

I"m sure no expert at growing Eremurus - the one shown is crammed in under the canopy of a sour cherry tree and is leaning out to the light.  I had some nice Eremurus stenophyllus that bloomed nicely with multiple flower stalks for many years, until they eventually got too shaded.  They didn't like being moved - darned brittle roots.  So, I guess all I can recommend from my limited experience is probably full sun.  Hmm, now there's a thought.... if we dig out the Diervilla lonicera (that has gotten to be a bit of a bore with its suckering habit), it would create a nice, open, sunny spot for me to grow Eremurus... 

Some of the alpines are charming but here's the cutest thing we've ever seen in the garden... a northern saw-whet owl.

.

These little guys are 8" from stem to stern, and are amazingly tame.  This one is resting in a pear tree after lunching on a mouse... his(her?) digestive ruminations don't seem to be disturbed by the squawk and flutter of the grackles and robins, who occasionally remember he is still there and come back to shout at him.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Thanks for the advice Lori. Our plants are on a slight slope facing South so get whatever sun we get, so I'm not sure that is 100% of the answer for us. Do they flower each year for you? Do you feed them in any way? Good luck with the new plantings! :-)

What a most magical garden guest! She/ he does indeed look very relaxed and 'au fait' with the environment you provide. Do they nest on your land?

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

In my limited experience, they have flowered each year from the start, up until getting excessively shaded (or at least that was my diagnosis at the time).  The only fertilizing that's done here is one or two applications of lawn fertilizer in the spring, timed to be just before the rains, and broadcast over all.  No fuss.

No, the saw-whet owl is just a visitor to our yard and we've never seen one here before.  I wonder if it was possibly driven to look for new feeding grounds by the flooding along the forested riparian areas?

 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The Northern Saw-whet owl is really precious!  I saw my first Snowy owl just in the past year.  Very impressive, but I'm not sure which I'd like to see more.

 

Echium russicum seems to be a short lived perrenial here, lasting 3-5 years.  Only one has returned after these big hurrah last season.

         

More in the garden....

Digitalis lanata and Digitalis lutea? (well, it's not D. ferruginea that I received the seed as).

                   

 

A better pic of Gladiolus atroviolaceus

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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