Trillium ID

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Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01
Trillium ID

A friend has this in her garden and lost the label. Cute little bugger.

[Moderator note: re-uploaded photo, turned it upright, and sharpened a bit]

Cockcroft
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-27

It's hard to tell from the small picture, but it looks like T. pusillum to me.

Claire Cockcroft
Bellevue, Washington Zone 7-8

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That is my uneducated guess, too.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Jeremy
Title: Guest
Joined: 2009-10-01

Really! The two photos of pusillum in the galleries seem to show a much broader, green leaf, while the (admittedly poor) photo of the unknown has narrow, almost purplish leaves. Do you think those are just its early spring leaves? I'll try to get a better pic. And look up info on pusillum. Thanks!  J

Jeremy
Uxbridge, MA US Zone 6a
Consider that you might be wrong.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Well, as we've both said (especially me), we are not certain.

For myself, I seldom see the overall color (variegation not included) of any leaf as a distinguishing characteristic of any species. It can be so darn variable for so many reasons. But both the FNA and Fred Case say that T. pusillum has a  varying maroon tinge on the leaves.

The two pics in the gallery are of the same plant, not necessarily a representative of what is "normal".  I think if you google around, you find a lot more matching illustrations from reputable sources.  Fred also says in his book Trilliums:

Quote:

      One of the most interesting trilliums, Trillium pusillum occurs as a series of widely disjunct populations across the Southeast.  It is absent from extensive areas of seemingly suitable habitat between populations where it would be expected to grow.  Much like species isolated in islands, these small disjunct populations interbreed among themselves and, with local mutations, become slightly different from one another.  As a result, botanists have named many varieties, even considering some local forms distinct species....

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Looks like a form of Trillium pusillum to me too.

One of the named varieties is T. pusillum alabamicum, a bit hard to see, but here are seedlings coming up (2nd year true leaves). Fresh seed from John Lonsdale was sown out in the garden, 20 seedlings so far, 1 seedling showed up the spring after sowing, so this seedling has a year advance on the others and is showing three leaves (bracts).  Wonder how many years before flowering, probably 3-4 yrs is my guess.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Jeremy

I'm with Trillium pusillum var.....

Here's a shot of a plant flowering in the garden here early October.

Cheers Dave.

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Here is my verion of pusillum from 2012:

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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