Fritillaria

122 posts / 0 new
Last post
Arne
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-10

Thanks for the link and comments, mine is obviously not F. sinica. I aquired it here:
http://www.cgf.net/plantdetails.aspx?id=879
and it has taken a few years to establish. I grow it below a soutfacing wall and with a 'half roof' above so it get some summer dryness (but I may move it now ;)). I have F. monantha from another source, but that one is later and the stem is much thinner and the leaves are smaller, but that can just be variation.

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

At long last a nice day without gale force winds. Many of the F.affinis affinis are beginning to flower in the garden now. Here's a few of them. Very hard to spot from any distance, they really blend into the grass very well. Bees all over them. Of a few hundred planted I think most of them are through now and growing OK, including a few of the yellow form. About 50% will flower I think. Some flowers buds seem to have aborted, possibly due to late frosts here.
Once seed is collected this area of the garden will be burned, and then the seed will be scattered back around. Hopefully we can establish a self perpetuating colony within a few years.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Ron

I saw the pictures before the text and thought it was a posting from the wild. That is wonderful to have them growing in the garden like that.

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Thank you Tony, that is exactly the effect we were looking for. We are trying to reproduce, as close as we can,  where they grow most in USA, and where they were 'farmed' by Native American People in this sort of environment. The wild card is the soil, as we have grown flowering plants for years in a 'regular' flower bed. They have survived all of the vagaries of the North East England years weather ( including very wet and very dry summers ). We are on a foot of soil over very heavy clay. We'll see in years to come if they can cope and prosper. They are doing OK, but these were huge strong bulbs and would probably have grown this year in solid concrete!!!  Some Deer have been in and nibbled a few, and the late frosts have 'stopped some dead in their tracks'. Managed to spend a few hours today lying down in amongst them in the deep grass, ( with the cats of course!! ) watching the bees move frantically from flower to flower. Paradise!!! Not quite the same as being on the West Coast USA, but nearer and less costly!! ;D
I'm worried the Deer will be back each night and take more and more, but that's all part of the project.
If we can establish them and get them to multiply I will be in HEAVEN! It was so good in the Sun today!

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Ron

we found just a couple of plants near Ashland in Oregon in 2009 just by accident,we were looking for an erythronium when we spotted it. It is a magnificent species.

Here I have fritillaria liliacea in flower

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

Tony wrote:

Ron
we found just a couple of plants near Ashland in Oregon in 2009 just by accident,we were looking for an erythronium when we spotted it. It is a magnificent species.

It certainly is Tony. It seems capable of growing in most regular garden conditions, is variable is terms of size, form and colour, and readily produces seed and numerous small scales, so is easily propagated. The plants you saw in Oregon, ( thanks for the pictures ), were similar to all of the forms that I grow from material from Northern Oregon, in that they tend to be much more yellow in the flower, compared with the forms from further North. Not sure if this holds true in the wild for all populations, just a casual observation from all of the material I grow. I'm looking forward to checking this out one day along the West Coast,  ;D

Lovely F.liliacea Tony. Great proportions.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

From China, and out in the garden now, Fritillaria pallidiflora. An incredibly tough plant and one that I would think would survive in just about anyones garden with the minimum of attention. Attracts the bees in profusion, and sets seed very readily. The seed germinates freely and is easily grown on.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I definitely second the ease of culture of F. pallidiflora.

  And since general gardeners mostly know frits as brown hues, it's fortunate that they have this one to begin to open their fritillaria palatte to other possibilities. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

RickR wrote:

......... it's fortunate that they have this one to begin to open their fritillaria palette to other possibilities.  

And what possibilities they are Rick. Especially with the West Coast USA species, which have the greatest range of colours of all  ;D . White, Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Pink Purple and Black are all available as flower colours, ( and of course the Green and Browns you mention ! ).
I suspect that most gardeners consider the Genus as all being very tricky plants for a 'normal' garden. Of course some are, but not all. Alongside F.pallidiflora, species such as F. meleagris, F. thunbergii, F.affinis, F.acmopetala, F. grandiflora, F.messanensis, F.pontica, F.pyrenaica, F.raddeana, F.stribrnyi, F.tubiformis tubiformis and F. tubiformis moggridgei should all be considered as growable by anyone who is able to grow Daffodils, Iris, Tulips and / or Lilies, etc in their garden. I think that most if not all of the Chinese species should also be easy garden plants ( and there are some beauties in this group ). I cannot say this ( about the Chinese species ) for certain though as I have only had them growing in the garden for four years ( being the longest ). The next few years will tell. Providing the soil does not become dry for extended periods F. camschatcensis quickly forms very good groups and will even run around under the soil somewhat by means of stolons. Sometimes, I think, the key to getting these species to establish in the garden is to start off with good healthy material. All too often people over here fail because the bulbs they buy from Garden Centres in the Fall are of very poor quality and weakened, by desiccation, to the point where if they grow at all in the following spring, they very rarely have the strength to come again the next year. So growing from seed, buying in growth, or buying bulbs from a top quality seller will greatly increase the success rate for the average gardener.
Heres another that should be on the list above, F. involucrata. Another very tough plant, able to grow perfectly well in most conditions. Very easy from seed, which is produced in good quantities.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Longma
Longma's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-11-19

F. camschatcensis 'Japan Lowland Form'

Another very easy Fritillaria for the garden ( providing it never becomes too dry ) is F. camschatcensis. The bulbs are usually formed at or very close to the surface of the soil. Most people here fail with this species because they plant the bulbs too deep. This is the lowland form from Japan, flowering just ahead of the USA and Russian forms. Whether there is a  true 'Highland Form' is very much under discussion. This paper attempts to describe differences, but may have some flaws. -

http://eprints2008.lib.hokudai.ac.jp/dspace/bitstream/2115/26240/1/3(5)_P219-232.pdf

Personally I think that it is highly possible that the 'Highland Form' is distinct ( from some personal correspondence ), but I'm sure time and further study will tell. If it does exist then getting any seed is proving impossible so far,  ;D .

As a number of plants of this form are isolated with me ( the Alaska, British Columbia, Washington State and various Russian forms  also have isolated flowers which are hand pollinated ) then the visit of this pollinator, Calliphora vomitoria is fine with me. Seed set by whichever method is always sparse here for this species.

I'd dearly love to hear from anyone who has observations of this species ' in nature'.

53.69° N, Dedicated to West Coast Fritillaria, plus three other members of the subgenus Liliorhiza. I grow other Genera, as time permits !

Pages

Log in or register to post comments