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Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Beautiful Eustoma, Panayoti ... Oh that it were perennial ... !

Happy New Year to all members of NARGS and all members of the rock gardening fraternity from Cliff and Sue.

Not an alpine image this time, but a joyous tree from Brazil ... Chorisia speciosa - image taken in a beautiful public garden on Mallorca.  More images from this series taken on this lovely Balearic island can be seen on the following link:-

http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?topic=6405.0

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Haven't really got anything in flower but i love the foliage of Cyclamen, especially graecum though this unfortunately doesn't flower freely in the garden here. This is on a sand bed, growing through a carpet of Raoulia. Good wishes for 2012.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Nothing in flower here either but with each day a second or two longer now, here are some mountain scenes and some local alpines to make us yearn for spring!  Happy New Year, all!

                               

Happlopappus lyallii:
               

Epilobium latifolium:
                               

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Kelaidis wrote:

What! No images of late? I hasten to rectify this sad state of affairs! I am posting a picture of Eustoma grandiflorum I took last August in Fort Collins in an area where there used to be thousands. This year there were only dozens (weather? timing?). Always good to see this extravagant gentian relative that tries to masquerade as a Calochortus or tulip. We're not fooled! If only it were perennial and reliable in the garden!

It is one of the genera I am totally unfamiliar with although I've seen a picture or two.
Kelaidis, what do you mean by reliable in the garden? Is it difficult?

Lori, your pictures always make me feel guilty - guilty of sitting lazy in the sofa instead of getting out there where the diamonds are to be found  ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Just saw your question, Hoy, about Eustoma: they are essentially monocarpic (although perhaps perennial under ideal circumstances)...rather like Gentianopsis barbata and G. thermalis, they can be coaxed pretty easily to bloom once (like all gentians the seed is miniscule, the seedlings slow and easily fumbled)...but once they bloom, they usually die. And not many of us have the sorts of conditions that make them reseed: the Eustoma is essentially a plant of wet swales. Perhaps it would do so in Scandinavia?

I am appending a picture of Rohdea japonica at Denver Botanic Gardens. Although technically not "blooming", their bright red fruits this time of year are very cheering...

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Kelaidis wrote:

Just saw your question, Hoy, about Eustoma: they are essentially monocarpic (although perhaps perennial under ideal circumstances)...rather like Gentianopsis barbata and G. thermalis, they can be coaxed pretty easily to bloom once (like all gentians the seed is miniscule, the seedlings slow and easily fumbled)...but once they bloom, they usually die. And not many of us have the sorts of conditions that make them reseed: the Eustoma is essentially a plant of wet swales. Perhaps it would do so in Scandinavia?

I am appending a picture of Rohdea japonica at Denver Botanic Gardens. Although technically not "blooming", their bright red fruits this time of year are very cheering...

Thanks, Kelaidis. Wet swales shouldn't be too difficult to find! Maybe I should try Eustomia when I get a chance. . . .

Rohdea also is an interesting genus. Nice berries.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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