Epimedium 2013

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Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Mark's Star is really exceptional in so many ways: color blends, floriferousness, flowers lofty above the foliage, etc.
It seems dwarf, too (?)

And Mandrin Star ain't too shabby either. (He says in Minnesota speak.)

Thanks Rick.  Yes, 'Mark's Star' is dwarf too, truly a rock garden sized thing, thanks for your comments.  I do really like how the flowers are well about the foliage, something I'm aiming for in my hybridization.

Gerrit, what can you tell us of 'Mandrin Star'?  The name comes up both as 'Mandrin Star', but many more hits on 'Mandarin Star', which makes sense.  I can't find hardly any information on it, please tell us where it is from.  Only a couple pictures found on google, in those the flowers look like E. stellulatum or E. pubescens, but your photo shows a much more substantial flower with strong outer sepals.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

I contacted Koen van Poucke, where I bought this plant and he confirmed it to be a plant with stellulatum  blood. So maybe the right name is Epimedium stellulatum 'Mandrin Star'.

I have 3 E. stellulatum and here are the pictures.

1. Left: Epimedium 'Mandrin Star', right Epimedium stellulatum 'Long Leaf Form'.
2. Flower of E. 'Mandrin Star'
3. Flower of E. 'Long Leaf Form
4. Foliage of Epimedium 'Wudang Star'
5. Flower of E. 'Wudang Star'.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Well, the 'Mandarin Star' form is very nice, looks like it has considerably larger flowers than normal.  I do think it should be called 'Mandarin Star' versus 'Mandrin Star', as 'Mandarin' is a Chinese dialect and would make sense for a Chinese species. To re-emphasize the point 'Mandarin Star' is actually a hybrid and not a species selection, notice the size of the yellow petals and cup, way bigger than typical stellulatum. :)

Both 'Wudang Star' and 'Long Leaf Form' are new to my garden, so I shall get a chance to compare them on my own plants, and to the good photos you post showing them.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

The person who named it, might have his reason to choose for Mandrin. It sounds better than Ma-da-rin.
I will never change Mark's Star in Marc's Star for instance.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

gerrit wrote:

The person who named it, might have his reason to choose for Mandrin. It sounds better than Ma-da-rin.
I will never change Mark's Star in Marc's Star for instance.

I understand, but then again sometimes there are obvious "typos", naming mistakes.  I would bet money that the plant is named 'Mandarin Star', as 'Mandarin' is such a hugely prominent part of Chinese culture, whereas the word "Mandrin" basically comes up odd references.  You are correct to be conservative on this matter, but maybe ask Koen van Poucke to verify the "Mandrin" versus "Mandarin" question. 

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

regardless whether it is 'Mandrin' or 'Mandarin' it is a nice plant! And so are the others ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Yesterday I visited Koen van Poucke. I bought a new stellulatum. Epimedium stellulatum 'Yukiko'.
Of course I asked him about the name 'Mandrin' vs 'Mandarin'. He confirmed the possibility the latter is right. So, Mark let's call him 'Mandarin'. The plant might be from Robin White, from Blackthorn Nursery.

Tomorrow more about my new acquisitions.

Edit. Note, the leaves are much bigger than the fragile leaflets of the other cultivars of stellulatum. His performance too. Compare it with the tiny plants, showed before

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Some new species or cultivars are added to my collection after the visit to KVP

1 Epimedium grandiflorum 'Freya', an outstanding dwarf Epimedium. I lost him in a harsh winter 2 years ago
2 Epimedium koreanum 'Harald Epstein'.
3. Epimedium 'Red Maximum'. This hybrid from the hand of Koen is one of the most red Epimediums. Difficult to catch on a picture. Parents are E. grandiflorum 'Freya' and E. membranaceum. I saw this hybrid years ago for the first time in his 'treasure corner' and I was directly fond of him. A very healthy growth and the flowers above the foliage. And a deep red colour. And now Koen was able to sell him.

More to follow.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Gerrit, I see what you mean on E. stellulatum 'Yukiko', it is big and bold compared to others, should make an impressive specimen in time.  I have not heard of that stellulatum form before.

On your newly added cultivars, Freya looks nice, we're not likely to see it here in the US, although there are others with that general appearance (dwarf grandiflorum type, with the "white star" coloration on the back of the sepals); the one called 'Starlet' from Collector's Nursery has that form.

'Red Maximum' has striking flower form and color.  Do you know who selected and named that one?

On E. koreanum 'Harold Epstein', do be careful where you plant it; it is an aggressive runner with long underground stolons. I had an area with mixed epimediums and other plants, eventually decided it would be easier to move all other plants out, and just allow 'Harold Epstein' to fill the area.  At Garden Vision nursery (the original one), this epi fills about 20' x 20'.  It is beautiful, but just be aware of its spreading tendencies.  

It should be noted for NARGS Forum readers, E. koreanum was recognized only recently (2002) by Stearn as a species separate from grandiflorum, although one is likely to see the combination E. grandiflorum ssp. koreanum, but most plants under that name are actually yellow-flowered forms of E. grandiforum, known as E. grandiflorum f. flavescens. Unlike grandiflorum, E. koreanum spreads by rhizomes, 6-12" a year, and has few-flowered inflorescence or relatively huge individual blooms.

Here are a few photos of E. koreanum 'Harold Epstein' taken over the last week or so.  It is distinctive when emerging and flowering, as each growth point is like a sturdy flag pole, or street light, with the big soft yellow flowers popping off from the side of the pole, with a "flag" of young expanding leaves above.  The leaves get very large in time.

E. koreanum 'Harold Epstein'

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A few photos of Epimedium 'Sunshowers', a unique and beautiful epi originating from Far Reaches farm in Washington State; I got mine from Garden Vision a few years back.  Compact and floriferous, with specked foliage, and soft yet luminous yellow flowers and broad white sepals. It has a unique appearance on account of the nearly orbicular shape of the central cup on each floret.

E. 'Sunshowers'

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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