Utah Oxytropis?

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Hendrix
Hendrix's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-12-24
Utah Oxytropis?

I found this lovely, compact species growing in widely-scattered colonies in the Uinta Mountains, Uintah County, Utah, blooming on May 21, 2009. I was in the area of Brush Creek Canyon Overlook at an elevation of between 8,400 and 8,700 feet in large, open meadows ringed by aspen groves. I don't know if it is, indeed, an Oxytropis but it is definitely in Fabaceae. Can you help me put a name to my photos?

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hi Jane,

Sorry but I don't have an ID suggestion, just wanted to say what a lovely plant it is; I'm going to sit back to see if anyone else knows its name.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tingley
Title: Member
Joined: 2013-01-07

Might it be Astragalus lentiginosus? Just a guess on my part, check this- http://intermountainbiota.org/portal/taxa/index.php?taxon=4111&taxauthid...

Southwest Nova Scotia, zone 6b or thereabouts

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Jane, from your pictures, not an oxytropis.  Astragalus and Trifolium are candidates.

Hendrix
Hendrix's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-12-24

Could it be Astragalus spatulatus?  Here's a link to a herbarium specimen

http://herbarium.uvu.edu/virtual/search.asp?p=6&s=form&n=&o=Family,G.Gen...

This specimen was collected in the same general area I was in when I photographed this plant.

Jane Hendrix
Mountain View Experimental Gardens
Peak 7-Breckenridge, Colorado USA.
Elev: 10,000 feet
Zone 4
http://www.picturetrail.com/hendrix & http://www.picturetrail.com/snowtrekker7

 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

It is a pretty plant, anyway!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Very nice and such a prolific bloomer!! Would be well worth growing.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Are there particular characteristics that point to one genus or the other, or disqualify oxytropis in this case?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

In flower one of the easier to see differences is that in Oxytropis, the keel tip is beaked. In other words notched and not smoothly curved. They may have just the sightest notch or break in the curve in some species. In others species a more pronounced deeper cleft is displayed, so that it  seems to have a distinct lobe protruding from the edge of the keel tip.

I hope I described this well.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Examples... (and please correct me if I'm wrong):
Beaked keel on Oxytropis viscida and Oxytropis megalantha:
 

Rounded keel on Astragalus angustifolius:

NB.  To expose the keel for a clear look, pull apart the two side petals that enclose it.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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