What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Maggi - thank you for the name of the Matthiola. I bought a plant that looked the same or similar from Miroslav Stanek under the name alchemilloides which doesn't seem to make a great deal of sense, but intriguing none the less.

The crevice and tufa gardens in the Czech Republic were very inspirational, as was a trough demonstration that Vojtech Holubec gave. The stone we have is a little too bold by comparison, but this is a trough made up with some of the plants brought back: there are about twenty plants in here including Asperula boissieri, Salvia caespitosa, Convolvulus sundermanii, Callianthemum farreri, Crepis wildenovii, Androsace villosa ssp. glabrata, Veronica bombycina var. frederyana and Globularia incanescens. It will be exciting to see how these develop, and in the absence of tufa I think this will be the way to try growing a lot more of these plants. The trough is essentially filled with sharp sand with some 'clay loam' from the garden to fill the base and help anchor chock stones in the crevices. Probably some feeding will be necessary in time in the absence of a much more extensive root run for the plants, and hopefully they will give us propagation material and seed.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

That really makes trough planting easy for the uninitiated, Tim!
A simple thing, but it can be daunting for a newcomer.  Bravo!

Yet another round of really cool plants, Lori!  8)
Your "woolies" are amazing!

Lori wrote:

Well, Paeonia ostii looks like a great addition to the garden, whether or not you're ever inclined to add others.  Where did you get the seeds?

An advantage of having an all Latin list of trade plants/seeds on Gardenweb.  It tells readers I am serious about plants and not interested in the latest horticultural craze.  Consequently, when people want something on my list, I'm usually not offered a zinnia or marigold.  Such is he case with P. ostii.  I was offered seedlings of that (and Corylopsis spicata).  By the way, one Corylopsis was planted in the garden outside and didn't make it through the winter.  I am not surprised, but we need to keep testing.... !

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I forgot to mention, Rick, that the flowers of Xanthoceras sorbifolia are quite amazing!  Is it totally hardy for you?
What an excellent trough-planting demo, Tim.  Very inspiring!

A few more...
Pulsatilla vulgaris seedheads - a few plants are still in bloom, too:

Front yard, with Penstemon confertus, Antennaria rosea and Castilleja miniata - Lilium philadelphicum is in the background of the first photo:
 

Penstemon procerus:
 

Trough with Rhodiola rosea, Heuchera hallii, Aquilegia laramiensis, Saxifraga cuneifolia, Thuja occidentalis 'Tiny Tim':

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lori, very lovely Penstemon procerus.  Do you grow P.p. formosus and P.p. 'Alpenglow' as well?  They do well here.  Do you grow Penstemon spatulatus?  The foliage is great, but it doesn't flower heavily here.  I may even resort to a little blossom booster (diluted) next spring.  That works wonders w/ Lewisia tweedyi and w/ gentians.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Lori, I think that Eremostachys speciosa is a winner! No, they all are when I think of it.

Tim, you do have drainage holes in the bottom of the trough?

Rick, good luck with the ostii!

Paeonia obovata looks good now but the flowers are hidden somewhat by the leaves. The yellow tree peony P lutea var ludlowii is also in flower but not as much as last year.
A Meconopsis from seed (M horridula I suppose) and Arisaema elephas clumping up in the woodland.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Xanthoceras sorbifolia is completely hardy for me.  Even the flower buds are unhindered at -30F (-34C).  It is susceptible to verticillium wilt, however.  Flowers are nice, but I don't think I'd classify them as amazing.  The centers turn from yellow to pink-red with age.  At the right stage, it is easy to see the reason for the common name "Popcorn" tree. 

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Spiegel wrote:

Lori, very lovely Penstemon procerus.  Do you grow P.p. formosus and P.p. 'Alpenglow' as well?  They do well here.  Do you grow Penstemon spatulatus?  The foliage is great, but it doesn't flower heavily here.  I may even resort to a little blossom booster (diluted) next spring.  That works wonders w/ Lewisia tweedyi and w/ gentians.

Thanks!  I had P. procerus ssp. formosus in a trough but eventually lost it:
http://nargs.org/nargswiki/tiki-browse_image.php?imageId=1384
I don't have 'Alpenglow' or P. spatulatus... I need to improve my collection!   ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Lori, I saw Penstemon spatulatus on a NARGS trip to the Wallowas some years ago.  It grows easily here and the foliage is wonderful and very low, but it just hasn't bloomed heavily for me yet.

Michael J Campbell
Michael J Campbell's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Cypripedium californicum

Michael J Campbell in Shannon, County Clare, Ireland

http://www.facebook.com/michael.j.campbell.395

Lewisias, alpines ,South African bulbs
http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/michaelJcampbell63

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Trond - yes, one large drainage hole in one corner! (This was covered with some wire mesh and fine plastic shade netting). The trough is actually a lot more shallow than I would have liked, and watering will be the most important thing - but it is just outside the kitchen window in full view, so the plants will signal my neglect!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

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