What do you see on your garden walks? 2013

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

There are certain bog areas in Minnesota where Picea mariana proliferate from root sprouts.  There is a small industry that has built up because of them.  Workers go out and cut the little 2-4ft trees in the late fall to sell.  The harvest is heavily regulated by our state's Department of Natural Resources.  City folk  buy them as winter decoration for their outside pots and window boxes that they grow flowers in during the growing season.  Non-Minnesotans always say they have never heard of such a thing until they come here.  Apparently, it's just a Minnesota thing (?).  I'd be interested to know if this natural phenomenon or its economic use happens elsewhere.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

RickR wrote:

Apparently, it's just a Minnesota thing (?).  I'd be interested to know if this natural phenomenon or its economic use happens elsewhere.

I've never heard of this use for black spruce!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting, Rick! I don't know if times have changed, but certainly when I lived in Edmonton, I didn't see anything like the amount of container gardening- and especially those containers that are re'planted' seasonally, that I saw living in Toronto, so I wonder if there would be the same sort of market for those mini-trees here?
Also, as I mentioned,  I have not seen rooted branches growing up into trees- only forming skirts around the parents, but I certainly don't claim to have seen any vast amount of territory! Picea mariana is common here, however, I think there are some even right on my acreage, and many of them in the slough just beyond our fence...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Picea mariana is planted around here but it is not common. Neither this nor other spruces are used like you describe, Rick.

Here we usually buy seedlings of some pine with juvenile foliage for winter decoration indoors!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I don't think I've ever heard of pines rooting from cuttings, whereas most other conifers do slowly, so that probably explains why natural pines don't layer. I don't know enough about the taxonomy of conifers but pines do seem a race apart, and a lovely one.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

I visited a friend's garden a day or two ago, just south of Maidstone on the escarpment of the North Downs overlooking the Weald of Kent. She has a great collection of hellebores and snowdrops, some of the latter given to her as wild collections by the botanist Martyn Rix many years ago. Some of them are pretty amazing foliage plants (forms of G. elwesii) with very broad blue-grey leaves. The garden dries out significantly in the summer and grows these plants as well as I've seen them anywhere.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Lovely, Tim.  What is the yellow tree in the first photo?  Are those leaves or flowers?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

It's actually a form of Pittosporum tenuifolium, which must be borderline hardy in many gardens - especially this yellow leaved form. I think the position of the garden on a high ridge must mean frost is moderated by continuous breezes. It is not an alpine garden in any way, except for a nice variety of woodlanders, but still has that feel of a garden where the individual plants come first.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Interesting place, Tim. Those are some great leaves on the G elwesii for sure!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Nice to see a real spring, Tim. Here everything is still frozen solid. Even at midday in full sun the temperature only barely reaches +1C :(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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