Alpines October 2012

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Thanks, Lori- I will get around to showing some overviews eventually so you can all see what I've managed so far....lol  I'\ve taken pics at various stages, so I'll need to do a compilation...

Trond- the most important plant for me on Svalbard is a white/pale flowered dandelion- so please watch for any in seed  ;D

I don't think any of these dandelion cousins will have very exciting flowers, plus tallish flower stems, so that's why I put them on the berm behind the rock garden- where I can enjoy the foliage and they won't overwhelm any little delicate things :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Orostachys iwarenge has had enough time, in this warm summer and very extended fall, for the flowers to open:

Jovibarba hirta (or so I assume) in fall colour:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Stunning photographs of some amazing plants, Lori ... thanks so much for posting.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks, Cliff!  
With them blooming in the second year from seed or even the first, it doesn't look like I'm ever going to get much of a plant of Orostachys iwarenge going!  Well, it's nice to see it get to bloom, on the other hand.

More from the rock garden, just foliage... Edit: all are from seed this year, unless otherwise indicated:
Aethionema schistosum, a division purchased at the CRAGS sale this spring (thanks, Cathy!):

Inula verbascifolia:

Sideritis phlomoides:

Sideritis clandestina, with Lactuca intricata in the background:

Campanula topaliana... unfortunately monocarpic:

Eriogonum sp., with Lupinus wyethii (purchased from Beaver Creek this spring) in background:

Arabis androsacea, draping nicely (grown from seed in 2010):

Marrubium lutescens:

Artemisia caucasica:

Marrubium globosum:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

2 Saussurea nepalensis these still have long stemmed leaves from the seed pot, where they were in part sun and so packed in the pot they had to reach for light!

Your Saussurea nepalensis looks like the one I grew in 2009:

I think it was from a seedex though I am relying on my dim memories.  (Unfortunately, none of the seedlings wintered over.  I didn't get to see the bud shown in this photo in flower either.)

The Saussurea nepalensis I grew this year is also from a seedex and looks totally different:

Will the real Saussurea nepalensis please stand up?   ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Great stuff, Lori- loving all the Labiatae!
The Arabis really is getting some nice drape- how old is it? The Inula and Orostachys are excellent!

My Saussurea nepalensis seed was from Philippe, at the alpine botanical garden in France whose name I will need to make a point of remembering..lol, but  I don't know what his/their original source was.. Hope mine will winter over...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Lori - you seem to grow all the plants I love growing (silvers and greys) but in a much better setting! I must discover a source of tufa. Do you protect any plants over winter? Or are winter snows persistant enough to do this? Our winters tend to be mild and soggy, with very occasional snow and I cover quite a few plants. A great future project would be a 'tufa cliff' (Roy Elliott made one these years ago, with a cantelivered canopy, and grew some amazing plants in it).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

My Saussurea nepalensis seed was from Philippe, at the alpine botanical garden in France whose name I will need to make a point of remembering..lol, but  I don't know what his/their original source was.. Hope mine will winter over...

Yes, I think the one you are growing (and I grew in 2009) looks more likely...

On the other hand, it seems like the genus has an amazing range of leaf forms!   After growing Saussurea nupuripoensis this spring (from Holubec seed, so I assume it's correct) (on the left below) and Saussurea eopygmaea previously (from Pavelka seed), shown on the right below, I'm not too sure what might characterize Saussurea foliage!  ;D
 

Tim, most of these plants were just grown from seed this year, so come next spring, I may well find the odd one that did not winter over for whatever reason.  I don't normally protect any plants outdoors though... I'm really only interested in plants that will be hardy without any particular fussing by me.  A possible difference between here and there is that protecting plants here is usually to insulate them against cold, whereas there, given soggy winters, it sounds like keeping water off might often be purpose for covering them (given that you are in so much milder a climate, compared to zone 3, that "cold hardiness" must be less of a concern).  Having lived/gardened in this same place for 16 years now, it seems the norm used to be very sporadic and inconsistent snow cover, with the usual periods of snow melt and exposure caused by chinooks.  The last 3 winters have been much snowier though, with much more consistent snow cover... not sure that this has been a particular advantage IMO.  (Last winter was quite hard on many plants that had been growing happily for years, despite the supposed advantage of snow cover.)  

Love those tufa cliffs and walls!  I wonder if anyone has done one here?  Without hearing of any local experiences, I suspect to have one here, in this dry climate, might require some sort of watering system... or else a lot more attention than I'm likely to provide...  ;D ;D

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

Lori- I think you are right that Saussurea foliage would be rather hard to typify- some have compound leaves, many others entire, with our without toothing, etc.. I like the one you show with linear leaves..

As for tufa towers, besides issues of water, I wonder about issues of exposure in winter for such a structure in colder climates? In fact, I'm a bit nervous about some spots on my new rock gardens, as I built them a bit steep/high to try for greater drainage without exceptional materials.. not too much planted at the peaks of all of them yet, time will tell if those spots have any more winter difficulties..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lots of interesting plants, everyone!   Lori, that Campanula topaliana would sure be a genus stumper.  Mark would love that one.

Late blooming species always seem to surprise me with their "hurry up" growth so late in the season when I think there is never enough time to mature.  Such a plant seems to be Orostachys iwarenge for me.  

         23 September 2012                 1 October 2012
       

                            14 October 2012
       

I have no idea what well grown seed capsules should look like. Do they seem like they will have viable seed?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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