Alpines July 2012

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

A couple of wonderful alstroemerias originally grown from seed from Jim and Jenny Archibald:-

Alstroemeria garavantae - (Chile, V, Cerro Vizcacha. Ex. a J. Watson coll.). This has done well and self   
                                        seeded on a raised bed over many years, growing to around 30cm).

Alstroemeria pulchra      - (Chile, V, Valparaiso, Con Con. Ex. Beckett, Cheese and Watson 4762). A more 
                                        tenuous plant which by accident has seeded into a peat/bark raised bed!

In Jim & Jenny Archibald's seed list for August 2006 are 25 Alstroemeria of which I have grown 8 or 9, at least for several years, which shows what potentially good plants they can be for the garden once growing conditions have been mastered. (I speak from the relatively mild south-east of the UK! Jim grew these planted out in a glasshouse, from which to harvest seed, but they are hardy with us to -10°C or a little lower).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Awesome Alstoemeria Tim, beautiful flower markings.

Lori, had to look up Cancrinia tianshanica, found the following Holubec photo link, it looks like a wonderful yellow buttopnhead alpine that looks like a tiny Tanacetum or NZ Craspedia.
http://holubec.wbs.cz/3Borohoro-Shan_-Xinjiang.html

Nice dwarf Delphiniums, I was going to show D. forrestii, but a rabbit ate all the leaves and buds leaving just nude stalks. :(

Moderator edit: Spelling of Cancrinia  :)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Echoing what Mark has said... amazing Alstroemeria, Tim!

Too bad your Delphinium forestii got munched; looks like a very interesting one:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=91153&flora_id=800

Jurinea cadmea:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Taking a minute to post a few shots...
Telesonix jamesii v. heucheriformis:
 

Monardella odoratissima v. odoratissima:

First flowers on Saxifraga cochlearis minor:

Stachys lavandulifolia, a rather spreading one that I will likely have to control or move (like the Monardella):

Repeat bloom on Dryas octopetala:

Flowers developing on Ajuga lupulina:

And a flower stalk on this teensy Saxifraga umbellulata v. pectinata... the basal rosette is slightly over a cm across:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

Too bad your Delphinium forestii got munched; looks like a very interesting one:
http://www.efloras.org/object_page.aspx?object_id=91153&flora_id=800

It flowered last year, but does not look anything like the photo in the link you provide, most likely what I have is a misnomer, but it was a nice low-to-mid-size Delphinium anyways, I was hoping to post photos for a proper ID.  Maybe next year.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Agoseris glauca in bud, from seed in 2011 - not sure how truly rock-garden worthy this will prove to be, though I enjoy seeing them in the mountains here:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Going back a little (been away in the beautiful Dolomites for three weeks) to your magnificent Trachelium, Michael ... and I know you don't exhibit your beautiful plants any more ... in a clean pot that would have been up for 'Best in Show'.  A magnificent plant.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Michael J Campbell
Michael J Campbell's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

;D ;D ;D

Michael J Campbell in Shannon, County Clare, Ireland

http://www.facebook.com/michael.j.campbell.395

Lewisias, alpines ,South African bulbs
http://picasaweb.google.co.uk/michaelJcampbell63

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Michael wrote:

Trachelium asperuloides

Splendid :)

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Merlin
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-24

So nice to see so many gardens still flush with blooming alpines. As for my garden things are pretty slow, the 100+ F temps have sent some plants into summer dormancy. some plants on the other hand are on round two of blooming. here are a few pics from yesterday(July 17).
E. holmgrenii second time aroun on the blooming
http://photos.imageevent.com/teita/rgmay132011/websize/IMG_1317.JPG
Lupinus lepidus with some sort of drabas
http://photos.imageevent.com/teita/rgmay132011/websize/IMG_1312.JPG
Heterotheca jonesii blooms until hard freeze
http://photos.imageevent.com/teita/rgmay132011/websize/IMG_1315.JPG
Clematis hirsutissima blooms more or less continuous in the summer
http://photos.imageevent.com/teita/rgmay132011/websize/IMG_1313.JPG
Zauschneria garrettii just getting going
http://photos.imageevent.com/teita/rgmay132011/websize/IMG_1324.JPG

Jim Hatchett, Eagle Idaho USA  Zone 5? 11" average annual precipitation

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