What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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cohan
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Joined: 2011-02-03

No witchazels here ( I may have seeds in somewhere, no seedlings though, I don't think...) any Rosaceae without thorns is fair game (our discussion of Sorbus somewhere on the forum...) but willows and poplars are also very popular, probably the small birches  and alders as well-- the moose spend more time in those wet shrublands  than anything, around here... the open woods are also full of tall poplar saplings which are broken at 7-9feet (maybe less?I'd have to pay attention) where the moose have purposely broken them so they can reach the tender branch tips which are only near the top..
Generally its not a problem, especially for the native shrubs and trees-- there are abundant semi/natural areas, so numbers of native shrubs are high enough they are not that adversely affected (i.e. they can flower and fruit, though not get as tall as they might! browsing is mostly in winter), though exotics may not be as well adapted (apples!)..

I visited a natural area to the west of here, and noticed all the Amelanchier and some other things were browsed to just a couple of feet above the ground...

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Fermi
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Joined: 2010-03-03

Rain during the last week has brought about another explosion of Habranthus and Zephyranthes and spurred on more Lycoris!
Zephyranthes "Grandjax"

Zephyranthes "Ajax"

Zephyranthes candida

Lycoris elsae

Rhodophiala bifida

cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

We have just put a fence around the garden to keep the dog in and the rabbits out, but oh I would have real problems if we had moose around (!), the garden is full of fruit trees, let alone all the other woody plants it sounds they love. I know a few people who have trouble with deer, and such wildlife must have a big impact on how the garden can develop. (When we were infested with rabbits I did a detailed survey day by day of their activities, which curiously enabled me to tolerate them somewhat better!).

To provide a little spring cheer, the bright Eranthis 'Guinea Gold'. This sterile so one doesn't get the widespread drifts of the species which can seed very well in favoured gardens.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Like the Zephyranthes Fermi - only candida is really hardy here - and the Rhodophiala is very nice and free flowering; I hope my plant will do this in the summer.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Steve Newall
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Title: Member
Joined: 2011-08-23

Tim wrote:

We have just put a fence around the garden to keep the dog in and the rabbits out

6 months ago I put up a rabbit fence which needed 400m of rabbit netting . I built it around a rabbit and it's still in here despite my best efforts .

Balclutha , New Zealand

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Oh I love it! They really are pesky creatures. A few years ago I found a nest (if that's the right word) of tiny rabbits in a large pile of shreddings, so I hope you only have the one in the garden!

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I find a nest in my yard most years.  Fortunately, I have always discover them before the babies get too big to catch.  Rabbits love witchhazel too, and the really love sassafras.

Jandals, have you tried a cut apple to bait them?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Nice flowers, Fermi and Tim!

Still growing only snowbanks here! ( http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=930.msg15658#msg15658 )

Here's the mock orange/Philadelphus again.... amazing how much snow those thin branches can hold! followed by Lilac/Syringa and an apple/Malus

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Fermi
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

cohan wrote:

Nice flowers, Fermi and Tim!

Still growing only snowbanks here! ( http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=930.msg15658#msg15658 )

Here's the mock orange/Philadelphus again.... amazing how much snow those thin branches can hold! followed by Lilac/Syringa and an apple/Malus

Amazing, Cohan,
reminds me of the soap suds scene from "The Party"!
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Hoy
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

I'm glad to say I have no rabbits! (The slugs are out BTW and have started destroying some of the early plants >:( )

At my mountain cabin we have European elks (and some stray sheep) and at my summerhouse we have deer and sheep. Small rodents are everywhere of course.

It's as you say, Cohan, the Philadelphus is never scratched by any critter nor broken by heavy snow!

Nice bulbs, jandals Fermi! I'm sorry I can't grow them outside here - I assume. . . . .

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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