What do you see on your garden walks? 2012

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I've never noticed a scent from Campanula thyrsoides - is it the dry air here or my lack of attention?  ???   I'll have to take notice this summer!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Sellars
Sellars's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

The first Frit is in flower in the greenhouse; Fritillaria pudica - one of our natives.  Another almost native, Douglasia nivalis from the Wenatchee Mountains, is in flower in the Alpine Shed.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

Feature your favourite hikes at:
www.mountainflora.ca
MountainFlora videos:
http://www.youtube.com/user/MountainFlora

Toole
Toole's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-07-02

Just went out and sniffed Campanula thyrsoides again --i'd call it a citrus scent .Yummy  :)

Nice pics David --while repotting bulbs recently i see i'm just left with a swarm of F.pudica babies --no trace of the flowering sized bulb that bloomed the last two years  :-\...

Cheers Dave..

Invercargill
Bottom of the South Island New Zealand
Zone 8 maritime climate
1100mm,(40 in),rainfall p.a.
Nil snow cover

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Toole wrote:

Just went out and sniffed Campanula thyrsoides again --i'd call it a citrus scent .Yummy  :)

Nice pics David --while repotting bulbs recently i see i'm just left with a swarm of F.pudica babies --no trace of the flowering sized bulb that bloomed the last two years   :-\...

Cheers Dave..

The very first thing I do with any flowering plant, is take a whiff, for me it is one of the primary aspects of gardening.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

McDonough wrote:

The very first thing I do with any flowering plant, is take a whiff, for me it is one of the primary aspects of gardening.

Alas my nose doesn't always detect what other people do.  Gardenias, for instance, have no smell for me!  I do smell things other people can't, though.  I have a friend with a particularly good sniffer, and sincerely loves to smell flowers, etc.  When she comes over, I take good note of her "experiences" as we walk the yard.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Around the garden this week we have the first of the Belladonnas, Amaryllis belladonna - most likely a hybrid - in a cerise/deep pink form

Lycoris sprengeri

and Lycoris incarnata

We can't grow Gaultherias but the berries on this Eremophila debilis almost make up for it!

cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Fermi wrote:

We can't grow Gaultherias but the berries on this Eremophila debilis almost make up for it!

cheers
fermi

Fermi, you folks down under have some of the coolest plants ever, the fruits on that Eremophila are fetching!!!  Never heard of Eremophila, so looked it up, what a suprise, a large and colorful genus (beautiful flowers too), all endemic to Australia.  Here are some highlights:

Eremophila, Emu Bush, Poverty Bush or Fuchsia, 215 recognised species, all of which are endemic to Australia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eremophila_(plant)

The genus name Eremophila is derived from the Greek words eremos (desert) and phileo (love), alluding to the species' adaptation to arid environments.

E. subfloccosa
http://www.anbg.gov.au/gnp/interns-2006/eremophila-subfloccosa-pl-700.jpg

Google images:
https://www.google.com/search?q=Eremophila&hl=en&prmd=imvns&source=lnms&tbm=isch&ei=prY7T7fvEuPX0QHHu6S6Cw&sa=X&oi=mode_link&ct=mode&cd=2&sqi=2&ved=0CAwQ_AUoAQ&biw=1340&bih=560

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

McDonough wrote:

The very first thing I do with any flowering plant, is take a whiff, for me it is one of the primary aspects of gardening.

Alas my nose doesn't always detect what other people do.  Gardenias, for instance, have no smell for me!  I do smell things other people can't, though.  I have a friend with a particularly good sniffer, and sincerely loves to smell flowers, etc.  When she comes over, I take good note of her "experiences" as we walk the yard.

I'm one of those people with a particularly good sniffer :)  When visiting gardens, I might point out how this or that plant is sweet smelling or aromatic in some way, often a complete surprise to the gardener who has grown the subject plant for years but hadn't yet bothered to check for scent.  I guess I'm just a hand's-on and nose-on sort of gardener ;D.  I have heard it said that woman have better sense of smell than men, not sure if that's urban legend or has any basis in fact. 

But it's the aspect of scent that can actually influence my planting decisions.  For example, I planted a clump of Aster pilosus at the base of my deck stair, grows to 4'-5' tall with myriad very late white blooms that waft an enticing scent of vanilla, reminiscent of sugar cookies baking.
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=159.msg1037#msg1037

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Fermi - nice to see those Lycoris flowering. I have a few that originated from Jack Elliott's greenhouse and which I have tried outside; they grow but have very rarely flowered, presumably lacking sufficient summer heat (even though they are against a south wall). I wonder if anyone has tried crossing them with nerines? They do have a wonderful range of colours.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Not an impressive display yet, but I believe this is the earliest date in my garden that a crocus has opened a flower, in 25 years that I have been here; Crocus vitellinus showing its first flower on February 18, 2012.  Always the first crocus to bloom, but typically not until March. The shiny strap foliage nearby is Sternbergia lutea, foliage always stay evergreen and in good shape through our winters, with or without snow.

Back to my precocious Colchicum kesselringii; the flower on the left is the same one I showed taken 8 days ago, it has narrow pointed petals, the one on the right is a different form with larger flowers and wider rounded petals, just showing up.

The nights have gone down as low at 10 F (-12 C), but these blooms seem unfazed, their early showing from a non-ending succession of very mild winter days, mostly sunny, into the mid 40s F, was 48 F yesterday.  Still no snow, this might be a snowless winter, a rarity.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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