Epimedium nursery

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Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Wim - I'm with you on trialling these epimediums!! Trouble is the more you grow the more hybrids will appear all over! How do you get on growing them in your garden? I have found smaller plants quite difficult to establish and grow on; once they get going though they make very strong and dramatic plants. After seeing all these details (and pictures) from Mark, though I am going to try more - they are the most fascinating of plants (along with relatives like Ranzania which I've wanted to grow for years but very rarely seen).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Tim wrote:

Wim - I'm with you on trialling these epimediums!! Trouble is the more you grow the more hybrids will appear all over! How do you get on growing them in your garden? I have found smaller plants quite difficult to establish and grow on; once they get going though they make very strong and dramatic plants. After seeing all these details (and pictures) from Mark, though I am going to try more - they are the most fascinating of plants (along with relatives like Ranzania which I've wanted to grow for years but very rarely seen).

Tim,

I grow mostly grandiflorum and x youngianum cultivars, once they are established they can start seeding very prolifically but since I grow a lot of different plants in between my Epies, I try to keep them in check (they can take over a corner of a garden in a couple of years (not that much of a problem with grandiflorum and x youngianum)) by weeding them away. Transplanting very small plants is not easy...I find it better to leave them in place (when possible) for a couple of years before transplanting....If you have to transplant them as seedlings I try to disturb the roots as little as possible, so I transplant them with a clump of soil. But I'm far from an expert, I got hooked to this genus a couple of years ago because of a friend/nurserywoman who grows close to 150 species and cultivars.

Ranzania japonica is a wonderful plant which I have killed a couple of times in the garden already  :rolleyes: And every year I get some new seed started (I have three pots of seedlings of this species, all sown in three consecutive years)  :rolleyes:  :rolleyes:

There are quite a few other plants in that family I like a lot too: Bongardia, Gymnospermium, Jeffersonia and Vancouveria.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Saori wrote:

I just fell in love with spurless Epimedium! They are some of the cutest things I've ever seen. :) I only grow five Epimedium myself, but I'm trying not to get too hooked; otherwise I will be broke!

I would love to see your plants! Do you offer a friends discount? :)

Hi Saori, yes the spurless Epimediums sure are cute.  One of my favorites is E. campanulatum.  In the link below is a photo of this plant with Arisaema sikokianum sticking up in front ;) 
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=24.msg1984#msg1984
...here's another view:
http://www.srgc.org.uk/forum/index.php?action=dlattach;topic=4769.0;atta...

If I ever get an Epimedium nursery going, I will look into establishing a "friend's discount" ;D

Here's a photo taken spring 2011, showing a flowering self-sown seedling of E. campanulatum, it looks exactly like regular E. campanulatum; I am somewhat suspicious of the claim most all Epimedium are self sterile, and this species will set tons of seed when little else is flowering nearby.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

WimB wrote:

Do you know if there's a society (or group) which is responsible for the registration of Eppie cultivar names? Like the one which is responsible for the names of bulbs (http://www.kavb.nl/)?

Don't think there is a registration authority for Epimedium yet, I wonder about this myself.  At the very least, I want to create a web page that has every species and named cultivar reference that I can find, with links to as many images as possible. Maybe I should start an Epimedium Society  ;)

WimB wrote:

There are quite a few other plants in that family I like a lot too: Bongardia, Gymnospermium, Jeffersonia and Vancouveria.

I like all of these too!  :)

Tim wrote:

I have found smaller plants quite difficult to establish and grow on; once they get going though they make very strong and dramatic plants.

Tim, I'm surprised to hear this, as I find Epimedium seedlings among the easiest and most resilient and forgiving seedlings of all.  I dig up self-sown ones all the time, throwing them into a cup bare-rooted, until I get a chance to pot them up of plant them out.  I have done this with perhaps a couple thousand seedlings over the last several years, they never miss a beat, never droop or seem the least bit concerned.  I have shown these following two photos before, but I rough-handle these little Epimedium babies all the time.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Saori
Saori's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-10-10

Mark, I just received mail from Karen saying that she will put me on her mailing list and she told me that she will not have E. campanulatum for sale this year, but she will have E. platypetalum. I found a Japanese blog that is written by an Epimedium enthusiast which discusses how they crossed platypetalum with Yubae (夕映) and came up with a very pretty flower. (I'm not sure that I can list the link without their permission here, so if anyone is interested in seeing the page, please PM me.)

Your picture of Arisaema sikokianum and E. campanulatum is wonderful! That's a woodland garden dream! :-*

From the beautiful Pacific Northwest, USA,
where summer is mild and dry but winter is dark and very wet... USDA Zone 7b or 8 (depends on the year)

 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

WimB wrote:

Do you know if there's a society (or group) which is responsible for the registration of Eppie cultivar names? Like the one which is responsible for the names of bulbs (http://www.kavb.nl/)?

Don't think there is a registration authority for Epimedium yet, I wonder about this myself.  At the very least, I want to create a web page that has every species and named cultivar reference that I can find, with links to as many images as possible. Maybe I should start an Epimedium Society  ;)

That's an idea ;)

McDonough wrote:

Tim wrote:

I have found smaller plants quite difficult to establish and grow on; once they get going though they make very strong and dramatic plants.

Tim, I'm surprised to hear this, as I find Epimedium seedlings among the easiest and most resilient and forgiving seedlings of all.  I dig up self-sown ones all the time, throwing them into a cup bare-rooted, until I get a chance to pot them up of plant them out.  I have done this with perhaps a couple thousand seedlings over the last several years, they never miss a beat, never droop or seem the least bit concerned.  I have shown these following two photos before, but I rough-handle these little Epimedium babies all the time.

I've had the same experience as Tim....maybe something climatological?

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Saori wrote:

Mark, I just received mail from Karen saying that she will put me on her mailing list and she told me that she will not have E. campanulatum for sale this year, but she will have E. platypetalum. I found a Japanese blog that is written by an Epimedium enthusiast which discusses how they crossed platypetalum with Yubae (夕映) and came up with a very pretty flower. (I'm not sure that I can list the link without their permission here, so if anyone is interested in seeing the page, please PM me.)

Your picture of Arisaema sikokianum and E. campanulatum is wonderful! That's a woodland garden dream! :-*

Saori, to the best of my knowledge there's no restrictions to posting URLs or links, so feel free to post a link to the blog site showing a hybrid between E. platypetalum and grandiflorum 'Yubae', we're all anxious to see it... I'm curious to learn whether gthe spurless flower form is preserved or do the flowers gain spurs from Yubae.  Here's a link to Epimedium 'Yokihi' on the Plant Delight's pages, a delightful color combination, a hybid of E. davidii x grandiflorum 'Yubae'.  As soon as I get my tax return, I'm placing a Plant Delight's Nursery order (mostly eppies).
http://www.plantdelights.com/Epimedium-Yokihi-Yokihi-Fairy-Wings/product...

From 2010 hand pollination and resulting seed, I do have some E. campanulatum hybrid seedlings coming along, we'll see if I get anything interesting.  Also, several seedlings appeared close to the mother plants, they went unnoticed, so they're already at about a 2-year size, they should bloom this spring.

Thanks for the comments about my garden, it has its moments, in selected vignettes, in other areas is quite the mess.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Mark - the main problem I have had has been establishing divisions of named varieties even though they have had quite good root systems. The one time, perhaps stupidly, I tried to divide the white form of Jeffersonia dubia, I had the same problem, and I have assumed since that many of these plants resent root disturbance. I have grown Jeffersonia from seed in pots on the nursery well, but it's not too vigorous in the garden - we may get too dry in the summer at times. I am getting a bit more success between the apples (which are smaller and deeper rooting than other trees in the garden), where I have also put copious compost down. I would certainly like to persevere with the epis because they are fascinating plants, and often have such intriguing foliage. I will watch out for your potential webpage! (We haven't had much in the way of self-sown seedlings, perhaps because our garden is not ideal, but I have tried planting different forms of the same species adjacent to one another with the hope of getting good seed set. It must be very exciting to see some of the hybrids that arise when you grow such a range of plants).

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Although I have never divided a Jeffersonia, both species' seedlings are incredibly forgiving for me.  Compared to most plants, they seem to have a much larger root system per leaf area, especially at this stage.

I have about the same amount of annual precipitation as you, Tim, and with temps reaching at least 95F (35C) every year.  It would seem there is something more in play for you than just those conditions...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Saori
Saori's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-10-10

McDonough wrote:

Saori, to the best of my knowledge there's no restrictions to posting URLs or links, so feel free to post a link to the blog site showing a hybrid between E. platypetalum and grandiflorum 'Yubae', we're all anxious to see it... I'm curious to learn whether gthe spurless flower form is preserved or do the flowers gain spurs from Yubae.  Here's a link to Epimedium 'Yokihi' on the Plant Delight's pages, a delightful color combination, a hybid of E. davidii x grandiflorum 'Yubae'.  As soon as I get my tax return, I'm placing a Plant Delight's Nursery order (mostly eppies).
http://www.plantdelights.com/Epimedium-Yokihi-Yokihi-Fairy-Wings/product...

Here is the link that I was talking about:
http://iroha.s7.xrea.com/ep/log/eid146.html It is a very pretty flower and I really like it! I would definitely buy it if I could find it for sale...

McDonough wrote:

From 2010 hand pollination and resulting seed, I do have some E. campanulatum hybrid seedlings coming along, we'll see if I get anything interesting.  Also, several seedlings appeared close to the mother plants, they went unnoticed, so they're already at about a 2-year size, they should bloom this spring.

I was wondering if your E. campanulatum hybrid seedling is a spurless flower form... I'm very much looking forward to seeing them as well!

From the beautiful Pacific Northwest, USA,
where summer is mild and dry but winter is dark and very wet... USDA Zone 7b or 8 (depends on the year)

 

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