Epimedium 2012

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gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

Every year the last one. Epimedium ilicifolium. Nice eppie.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

I agree Gerrit, Epimedium ilicifolium is a nice eppie.  Is yours finishing up now?  You clone looks a little bit different than mine, I think there are a number of clones in cultivation, the leaves on my plants looks more narrow... I like the look of your plant with fuller leaves.  Mine is setting seed, still flowering, and making fresh new flower stems, all at the same time, t is one that I find tends to rebloom.  In the photo, you can see a few blooms, a stem with seed pods, but harder to see are several new flower stems just forming.

E. ilicifolium:

One that I'm finally impressed by (took several years to "get going"), is E. x 'Windfire', with numerous upright stems and bright yellow flowers with ascending spurs, still making a good show.  Its been blooming for weeks.

A young plant of Epimedium x 'Flame Thrower', purchased last year as a tiny start, it's already putting on a fair show of red and cream-yellow flowers, big and spidery they are.

Other species just starting to flower include 'The Giant', E. elongatum, E. membranaceum, and a number of hybrids with membranaceum... photos to follow.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

gerrit
gerrit's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-04-03

My E. illicifolium is still with flowers as you can see. There are still buds and it's setting seed at the same time, just the same as your plant. Last week we had hot weather with temps between 25 and 28 degrees. Very clear intense blue skys with a hot burning sun. Dangerous conditions for eppies. I had to cover the plants with shadow material. And it's going on for the next days.

McDonough wrote:

One that I'm finally impressed by (took several years to "get going"), is E. x 'Windfire', with numerous upright stems and bright yellow flowers with ascending spurs, still making a good show.  Its been blooming for weeks.

A very special one indeed. I like the tall uprising stems. With so many yellow flowers. A very healthy hybrid, strong. With davidii-blood, I presume?

tropicalgirl251...
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-08

I have five Epimediums  in my garden.  Epimedium grandiflorum nanum and Epimedium grandiflorum rubrum I got three years ago are doing very well. The next two (I do not have names) are also coming up nicely. Epimedium lishihchenii which grew very well last year  is still emerging.

Krish

Saskatoon,SK,Canada
Zone 3a
one of the sunniest cities in Canada.
Temperature range +30C to -38C.
average annual precipitation 347.2mm.

tropicalgirl251...
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-10-08

more pictures

Krish

Saskatoon,SK,Canada
Zone 3a
one of the sunniest cities in Canada.
Temperature range +30C to -38C.
average annual precipitation 347.2mm.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Hello Krish,

Epimedium grandiflorum 'Nanum' is a really good one, stays small for a long time, but when maturing in good woodland soil, it can get fairly large (although the leaflets stay tiny and charming).  The second one is probably Epimedium x rubrum (a hybrid with E. alpinum), probably the single most common Epimedium in horticultural commerce, and a really good plant it is, one of my favorites. Hard to know about your unnamed ones, but suffice it to say, there is no such thing as a bad Epimedium, they're all so enjoyable, thanks for sharing.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A view of 2-year and 3-year Epimedium hybrid seedlings.  I evaluate them as much for foliage (if not more so) than flowers.

I have many hybrids between either E. brevicornu or the similar stellulatum, x the everblooming E. membranaceum, resulting in evergreen plants, with everblooming clouds of small white yellow-cupped flowers.

Two Epimedium davidii hybrids planted side-by-side.  On the left is a tiny-flowered hybrid of E. davidii EMR, on the right is a different E. davidii hybrid with floriferous sprays of large bright yellow flowers:

E. davidii selected hybrid on the left, on the right, a view to a nearby selected hybrid with pale speckled foliage.

Another view of of a low luminous hybrid with pale chartreuse speckled foliage; it's on my "watch list".

Two more views of the Epimedium davidiii EMR small-flowered red and yellow hybrid.  Interestingly enough, when I visited Garden Vision Epimediums nursery a few weeks back, they had a large block of plants that looked exactly like my hybrid... when I checked the label, it too was labeled as an E. davidii EMR hybrid!

The following is a selection I made a few years back, a dense squiggly-leaved plant, which is interesting to grow as a foliage plant alone.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Some nice results, Mark.  It seems I've forgotten what "EMR" means...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

RickR wrote:

Some nice results, Mark.  It seems I've forgotten what "EMR" means...

Epimedium davidii EMR refers to one of the original collections of this species, EMR4125, made by Martyn Rix in the Mupin Valley (now Baoxing), the first clone of this species introduced into the United States (this info, from one of the past Garden Vision Epimedium catalogs).

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Krish, back to your unnamed "eppies", I think the first one in the photo labeled "Epimedium sp.jpg" might be 'Pink Elf', which is becoming a popular item in the nursery trade.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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