Image of the day - 2012

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Myosotis asiatica and Potentilla uniflora(?):

             

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A beautiful place to take a walk!

The Myosotis is very similar to this one from Turkey:

Unknown Myosotis and morning view of Lake Van

 

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

James wrote:

I wish I'd seen it in flower.  I am sure it was rather nice.

James   

See here:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=779.msg11305#msg11305

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

A trough with Alyssum oxycarpum. When not in bloom, the foliage is tiny, tight, and neat, a classic alpine; in bloom the stems extend to surprising length when considering the tiny basal rosettes, expanding into a fine show of golden blooms. In bloom early June, 2011.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Two views of Alyssum oxycarpum foliage in late March 2011.  I bought this as a seedling at a New England Chapter NARGS meeting in September 2010; I'm just going by the name as labelled.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Tim Ingram
Title: Member
Joined: 2011-04-27

Mark - have you ever come across Alyssum serpyllifolium? I grew this years ago and the foliage was the exact same as you last photos but the flowers were virtually stemless. These little alyssums are great plants, but for most rock gardeners eclipsed by their bigger cousins.

Dr. Timothy John Ingram
Faversham, Kent, UK
I garden in a relatively hot and dry region (for the UK!), with an annual rainfall of around 25", winter lows of -10°C and summer highs of 30°C.
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Mark, A remarkable plant! Your last picture of Alyssum oxycarpum shows a very succulent-looking specimen but the first picture when the plant is in flower seems to show a more "normal" plant. Is the plant as succulent as the last picture shows?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

A little colder the last day - cold air from east has brought dry and cloudless weather but much colder than we are used to this winter. The remaining sleet and slush has frozen solid. Though, the Crocuses just wait for more sun to open their flowers.

   

The witch hazel is flowering although the colder weather does that the flowers contract a little.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

McDonough wrote:

Two views of Alyssum oxycarpum foliage in late March 2011.  I bought this as a seedling at a New England Chapter NARGS meeting in September 2010; I'm just going by the name as labelled.

Great looking plant!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

At one point I grew a number of dwarf Alyssum species, including several choice ones from Turkey, can't remember if serpyllifolium was among those I grew.  I was a bit alarmed with this species when the rosettes expanded and the stems grew taller and more diffuse than I would have imagined, but it was such a nice show for weeks, and then afterwards all the stem growth dried up and faded away, leaving behind the tiny "ropes" of succulent growth again, looking nice for fall and winter.  The silvery ropes of congested foliage remind me of the strange South American genus Nassauvia, specifically N. revoluta, although these are Asteraceae and obviously not related to Alyssum.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

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