Opuntia basilaris

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Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04
Opuntia basilaris

I grow several forms and varieties of O. basilaris. The beavertail cactus is native to the Mojave and Sonoran deserts to about to 6,000 feet. The blue-gray 10inch long pads are shaped like a beaver's tail. Dense clusters of brown glochids are it's main defence.the flowers are hot pink/magenta. The fruits are dry and pearshaped. Mature clumps can get to be two foot tall and three to four foot across.

http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=OPBA2
http://www.calflora.org/cgi-bin/species_query.cgi?where-taxon=Opuntia+ba...
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242413847

Here are a couple of patches of Opuntia basilaris var. basilaris I have.

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Gee, now I see what all the hub-bub was all about when O. basilaris is discussed on
the Too Cold for Cactus group.

  Quite a beautiful species!  :o

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Aaron
I don't know what to say but WOW!! :D
I wish I had your space to work with!!

RickR wrote:

Gee, now I see what all the hub-bub was all about when O. basilaris is discussed on
the Too Cold for Cactus group.

Rick
I have posted to that forum to.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Thanks for the nice words. :)
Another from the LaMar garden (plantasiacactus gardens).  It is the hardiest, bluest, and best flowering ones I have.

I have one more that will grow here, but freezes back every winter.  Greener more tear drop pads.  So far the only two that will live through the winters here, and I have tried a few. :)

John I wish you had as much space as I have to garden with.  I can only imagine what you could do with a few acres. :o 

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Another beautiful cactus! -and I lack both land and climate :-\
No possibility to acquire more land, John?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

You can always buy land but you have to purchase the house too and the economy is not stable out here. Besides the fact that once you move out side the city limits you are in wild fire country. Just ask Aaron how it feels to see a wild fire rushing toward your property.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Here are a couple if forms of O. basilaris variety basilaris, were the pad shapes and size do not fit into to the standards set for the species.

This first form at one time held varietal standing but has been reintegrated back into variety basilaris. This was, in the past, known as Opuntia basilaris var. ramosa. The plant grows as a dwarfed forum about 1/3 the size of variety basilaris. The flowers , fruit, seed, and growth habit are the same . It would work well for the grower with very limited space.  

                                         

                                         

This second form is both dwarfed and the pads come out heart shaped. Again the pads are about 1/3 the size of the standard variety basilaris. In all other respects it is the same as variety basilaris.

                                       

                                       

                                       

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

O.basilaris var ramosa
I belive I have some like this also.  Very small, same flowers, hardy and dont seem to grow as fast. :)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Weiser wrote:

You can always buy land but you have to purchase the house too and the economy is not stable out here. Besides the fact that once you move out side the city limits you are in wild fire country. Just ask Aaron how it feels to see a wild fire rushing toward your property.

One nice thing about the city, weeds are much easier to control.  ;)  and fires dont spread at 20 miles an hour. :o

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

DesertZone wrote:

Weiser wrote:

You can always buy land but you have to purchase the house too and the economy is not stable out here. Besides the fact that once you move out side the city limits you are in wild fire country. Just ask Aaron how it feels to see a wild fire rushing toward your property.

One nice thing about the city, weeds are much easier to control.  ;)  and fires dont spread at 20 miles an hour. :o

Well, wildfire is never a problem where I live although it is some places in Norway. I am very glad I don't have to reckon with that!
I like all the forms of O. basilaris. Are they easy from seed?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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