Agave palmeri

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penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

The "woody lilies" are all very easy from seed, but getting them from there to the garden and having their little rear ends frozen off is not a happy journey.
I would hold off planting seed grown agaves, yuccas, dasylirions, and nolinas for at least a few years. They all overwinter as house plants very nicely. (This from someone who can barely get a philodendron to grow.)
Another ploy is to spray them with an antidesiccant like Cloud Cover. Yes, coating them with plastic.....

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Weiser wrote:

Aaron check your Email ;) The answer is Yes. ;D

I have recived a great gift!  Thanks again John. :)

I wont forget next spring to send that pup off and anything else you might want?

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

My palmeri is under about 5 inches of snow right now. Or it might not be, there's an incense cedar in front of it and maybe the snow didn't land on the agave. I don't feel like going out and looking.
Snow on marginally hardy succulents is a mixed blessing.

Maybe I'll go cover it before it gets completely dark. 

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Nold wrote:

Snow on marginally hardy succulents is a mixed blessing.

Bob

I agree, I have more things die from snow cover than cold.  Makes the yuccas, agave, and cactus rot around here.

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

I have more things die from snow cover than cold.  Makes the yuccas, agave, and cactus rot around here. 

Same here.
Though, if it's cold when the snow falls, and the snow is "dry", then there's less trouble. It's when the snow "melts" (really, evaporates) but not quite completely, then more snow falls, that spells doom.
Another thing that's a killer is a layer of ice right on the ground. That's only happened here once. It killed everything from South Africa, killed a lot of cactus, too.
I went out and put a small piece of frost fabric over Agave palmeri. I could have kept the plant indoors for a few winters, but it was free, so I figure, what the heck.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

DesertZone wrote:

Hey, anyone out there that wants some dasylirion w. seed I still have some from a plant close to this one. ;)

Aaron, do you still have some seed? I would love to try! Don't know what to trade with - not many desert plants here ;)

Dry snow cover? ??? Here the snow is always wet . . . .
Although I am familiar with dry snow cover in the mountains. At our cabin we prefere a thick snow cower.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Hoy wrote:

Aaron, do you still have some seed? I would love to try! Don't know what to trade with - not many desert plants here ;)

Dry snow cover? ??? Here the snow is always wet . . . .
Although I am familiar with dry snow cover in the mountains. At our cabin we prefere a thick snow cower.

I still have some, just pm your address. ;)

It get so clod here that the snow falls very dry and can not pack together. 

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

 Dry snow cover?

Yes, dry. If the ground is dry before it snows, and the snow doesn't melt (which it rarely does here from about now until February...it evaporates, technically, sublimates), then the plants are not wet, just cold.
If it rains first, or the snow is not quite frozen when it first falls, and more snow falls on top of that, then it's time to order new plants ...
As far as I'm aware, agaves and their relatives have no mechanism for moisture loss that allows them to endure subfreezing temperatures. There are a number of species that routinely experience temperatures of -10C (note, celsius) in the wild, but none that experience temperatures much colder than that. I imagine that the species that do infrequently see -17C have evolved some sort of way of increasing the sugar solution to lower the freezing point of the water in their leaves, but I don't know what it is, and don't know of any studies.
I might ask around.
The coldest temperature I've been able to find for the Chihuahuan Desert is -30C at Villa Ahumada in Chihuahua. But not every winter.
Does that make sense?
Here is Agave havardiana (or the tips of it anyway), same plants I photographed a week or so ago, this morning. These plants come from the Davis Mountains in western Texas. Still not a very cold place, but maybe just cold enough. We'll see.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Bob, makes total sense.

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

What's this talk of snow?  ;)
We have been dry and cold since the the beginning of November. Just a little on the top of the Sierras. It could change very quickly though. In truth, I hope it dose, water is always at a premium no matter what form it takes.  8)

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

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