some agaves

24 posts / 0 new
Last post
penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

I have a certain eccentricity and am not sure what a garden should look like! 

It's funny that people on this side of the Atlantic talk about the "English garden" as though it were something that could be fixed in the imagination. I suspect they mean Sissinghurst.
Add Logan and Tresco and you have a very different picture, don't you?

And I'm constantly reminded that Farrer grew a lot of western North American plants long before we did.
There's a pretty funny story in Weber about Jamesia americana too.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

DesertZone
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-08-20

Tim wrote:

I've not had great success with the hardier agaves, due to our soggy winters. Even with cover they don't prosper. Possibly bigger plants would be more adaptable, but I've only tried young plants grown from seed. However, I am really pleased by several dasylirions, which I imported from Yucca Do Nursery. At least in the sand bed these have prospered and not been damaged in our protracted cold last winter. I've only seen them before on Tresco (Isles of Scilly), where they make marvellous 'fibre optic' like clumps. Great plants.

Those look great!  Nice plants. 8)

Dry garden, little irrigation, 9" precip

Shoshone Idaho USA. Zone 5b-6a

Hot and dry in the summer, cold and snow in the winter.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

I thought about moving to Arizona so I could grow more dasylirions, but now I wonder if i shouldn't move to England .....

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Pages

Log in or register to post comments