This where I get thrown out of all the rock garden societies

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

Some very inspiring photographs, Tim and Trond!

Thanks, Rick ;)

Tim wrote:

Trond - do you ever visit the UK? We would love a talk on some of the extraordinary places you visit.

It happens, Tim. Had been interesting to take a look in your garden :o

Talking about nurseries with something "in the back". I'm fortunate to know one here. The owner always has a lot of special plants often in small quantity - and I have free access to his greenhouses. I know the guy that propagate the plants as well ;D

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Something else in the new rock garden.
Phlox longifolia. I'm probably the only person who would take a picture of a plant with one flower (and a few buds), but I did take this picture less than half an hour ago. P. longifolia has an extravagant display in May and June (and an equally extravagant desire to colonize), and then, for some unknown reason, decides to bloom again as soon as the weather turns cold.
This is actually in an older raised bed but I dug up some of the roots and moved it to the new garden, since it travels so extensively.
I think it was originally from Ratko seed.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Weiser
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-04

Bob
If you get thrown out of the Societies for not building an outcropping I'll be right behind you.

I've always wondered what the difference is between Phlox longifolia and Phlox stansburyi. I know I've seen them both named in the field but I'll be darned if I can see a difference.

From the High Desert Steppe
of the Great Basin and the Eastern
Escarpment of the Sierra Nevada Range
Located in Reno/Sparks,NV  zone 6-7
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sierrarainshadow/
John P Weiser

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Mark,

No linanthus yet. I did sow quite a bit of calochortus seed, as well as a number of other things.
These are "free range" calochortus, as opposed to the ones in the ranch, down in the lower portion of my estate. Those were also direct sown, but grown in armored "rodent proof" cages (no such thing, but I need to cling to my delusions), which, in my opinion, is the only way to do it.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Kelaidis
Kelaidis's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-02-03

Your mentioning growing Calochortus reminded me of your retirement party, Bob, when I was glorying in my Mariposa meadow with some other visitors and you suddenly appeared above me on the West Ridge like a sort of portable Zeus (Cindy Hera like at your side) and proclaimed your congratulations to me on planting such a wad of "Cheap Dutch Bulbs" leaving my hitherto awed audience in stitches. You are the master of the mot!

For every minion of the peaks there are a dozen steppe children growing in the dry Continental heart of all hemispheres still unknown to horticulture.

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Well, the main purpose of the new rock garden was to grow a number of Jerry Morris's unnamed and unnumbered conifers, a whole bunch of Allan Taylor's dwarf oaks, and drifts of free-range calochortus. Direct sowing of the last is in my opinion the only way to go.
The bane of the genus as a whole is not "excess moisture" (whatever that is), or "winter wet" (?), or cold, but rabbits
Very few rabbits find life in the back yard relaxing. Border collies find them an irresistible object for herding. At high speed, of course.
Meanwhile there are a number of species sleeping away, in relative safety, in the calochortus ranch.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Fermi
Fermi's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-03-03

Hi Bob,
I seem to remember that you once suggested (on Alpine-L and subsequently re-printed in our AGS Vic Group newsletter) that to protect susceptible plants from snails and rabbits to plant masses of Calochortus (any species - it doesn't matter) as decoys! ;D
I've resorted to sowing seed of Calochortus in pots but may try your suggestion of "free-range sowing" as well.
cheers
fermi

Fermi de Sousa,
Central Victoria, Australia
Min: -7C, Max: +40C

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

The main focus in the rock garden is the plants you grow, of course.  If you happen to live on rock, that's OK too.  The picture is of the latest hunk of ledge being cleared and rehabbed to be ready for spring planting, hopefully.  It's been a huge effort to remove poison ivy, saplings and well-established brambles, but worth the effort.  Our extended warm autumn has been a help.  By now the ground would normally be frozen solid. 

penstemon
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-06-24

Quote:

I've resorted to sowing seed of Calochortus in pots but may try your suggestion of "free-range sowing" as well.
 

Yes, well, live and learn. Sigh. The last few winters we've had snow on the ground for months on end, and the rabbits resorted to eating anything and everything. Agaves were eaten to the ground. (In the front yard.) I even saw a rabbit about to bite into a cholla joint, holding it like it was corn on the cob.

For years I sowed calochortus seed in pots. The seed would germinate, I left the pots outdoors for the winter (like I would for anything else), and come next spring, nothing. I attributed this to obvious things like being under a curse, since the seed must germinate in real life and create bulbs that live in the ground, until I talked with a science-oriented horticulturist who explained the difference in volume of soil in a pot vs. in a garden. Calochortus are not cold-hardy in pots.
That's why I now sow the seed direct. In the ranch, a semi-controlled situation, so I can see what germinates, or in the new new rock garden, but always directly into the ground.  With a label, if I remember it.

Bob

Bob

extreme western edge of Denver, Colorado; elevation 1705.6 meters, average annual precipitation 30cm; refuses to look at thermometer if it threatens to go below -17C

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

Bob, I've found the same thing to be true with plants in troughs.  If you're in zone 5, for example, many zone 5 plants in troughs will perish over the winter in a normally cold winter.  Abnormal appears to be the new normal, but that's  another topic.  I use plants at least one zone hardier in troughs and have no problems, but I learned this only after killing many plants in troughs.

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