late season interest?

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Another thought... many of the rock garden plants that bloom in mid-summer in warmer zones, would be "late season" plants for us here, given our short season.  Perhaps that will twig some more suggestions for far north late-bloomers?

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

Another thought... many of the rock garden plants that bloom in mid-summer in warmer zones, would be "late season" plants for us here, given our short season.  Perhaps that will twig some more suggestions for far north late-bloomers?

My mistake, I made an assumption that all Patrinia are late bloomers (like the way most or all Solidago are late bloomers), but looking up Patrinia sibirica in Flora of China, it is indeed a spring bloomer, flowering May-June.

http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=2&taxon_id=200022546

It's funny that one of the image links was to your photo, I didn't realize  :)  It's a small gardening world ;)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

It's been a funny old season here in Devon, a distinct lack of sun and plenty of rain. I had a quick trip round the garden yesterday getting a few pictures (and not very good ones too!) of plants that are flowering that shouldn't be. Ones I forgot to picture were a couple of small Rhododendron that have had odd flowers on them for weeks now. The Dryas in the last picture is having it's third show of flowers this year.

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

How bizarre, David!  I suppose I can understand the Dryas blooming again, as I see recurrent bloom on one of its parents, D. octopetala, both in the wild and in the garden, but the others seem most odd!  The Pulsatilla is especially surprising.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

deesen
deesen's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

Mmm. I had a Pulsatilla in bloom August 2010 too, another diabolical summer. I don't think it's unusual for Hellebores to throw up the odd flower out of season, I've seen them at the RHS Garden Rosemoor here in Devon, but this one of mine has been in full flower for weeks. Hope it doesn't mean it will now die on me ???

David Nicholson
in Devon, UK  Zone 9b

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

it is very common here that early spring flowering plants have an autumn flowering period too. Most of them produce the flowerbuds early fall and are ready for an early blooming next spring. The rather long season and mild fall weather together with the short days make them flower unseasonally.

If you have space you can try this one: Inula racemosa 2-3m (7-10ft) tall!

 

. . . or this one: Erysimum (Cheiranthus) cheiri.

Thisone selfsow and the seeds that germinate in summer bloom in fall.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I know you asked about rock garden plants, Carolyn, but it seems this thread has moved on, so here are some more late-bloomers, mostly common stuff, for the perennial garden  ;) - please pardon that everything in my yard looks ratty from hail damage!

Clematis x 'Pamiat Serdtsa' (x2); Campanula dolomitica; Eryngium planum:
     

Salvia glutinosa, which forms an impressively large plant... its name ("glutinosa") seems self-explanatory from the second photo!
 

A late-blooming Adenophora sp. - a pleasantly noninvasive one, not sure of the species:
 

Ratibida pinnata - our native R. columnifera is still in bloom too in the garden; Eryngium x zabellii:

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

I guess these are sort of rock garden-ish...
Cyclamen purpurascens (x2) - (though I grow them in more of a woodland-like setting); Inula ensifolia; Allium sikkimense (x2);
       

Dalea purpurea - done blooming in the wild, but the mega-specimens in the yard are still in bloom:

(More to follow...)

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

And now I'll bet you've just spent next spring's hellebore bloom, David...
-- Enjoy them while you can!

I don't know what to think about the pulsatilla, since there is just one (or two) blossoms...

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Here's a dryland prairie native that would probably be suitable for the rock garden, and is (obviously  :)) late-blooming... Heterotheca villosa.  They are in brilliant bloom in Bowmont Park now.  
This plant, from seed collected a couple of years ago at a roadside rest-stop in Saskatchewan, is planted along the sidewalk hell-strip next to the alley... very tough conditions out there, yet this tough plant is coping.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

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