Olympic Mountains

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Sellars
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Joined: 2009-12-29

A few more images from the Olympics.

Some of the mats of Douglasia laevigata on Elk Mountain were quite large. We also saw Saxifraga caespitosa and Phacelia sericea with Mt Olympus in the distance.  At the start of the Switchback Trail there were fine specimens of Pinguicula vulgaris right by the parking lot.  Finally a last look at Castilleja parviflora near the Obstruction Point Road.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

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Booker
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Beautiful, David ... the Collomia close-up is EXQUISITE!

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

What a flora - and what a photographer!

David, if I ever visit this part of the world, is it possible to hire you as a guide? ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

David, I've grown Collomia debilis, which I had seen in the Wallowas, for several years but then it peters out.  It likes a scree to ramble through.  My plant of choice would be Collomia debilis v larsenii, which I saw in a steep, shifting scree - definitely a soboliferous plant (such a delicious word!).  You can duplicate the scree conditions but it certainly doesn't like the humidity of the northeast.  Maybe it's just one of thopse plants which refuses to adapt.  When I saw it (across from Burroughs Mt. at Mt. Ranier - can' remember the name of the mountain), you could look down the steep scree and see it repeating itself.  The roots are anchored in the scree well above the plants.  Some of the flowers had hints of an icy blue, others a bit of lavender, quite wonderful.  Also love the Allium crenulatum.  Have you grown it?

Sellars
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Anne:

If I can get some seed of Collomia debilis I will give it a try.  I have not grown Allium crenulatum either.  I collected some seed of Phacelia sericea last year in our local mountains and now have five vigorous plants growing in pots with lovely silvery foliage. Have you tried it in the garden?  I understand it is a challenge.

I like the word soboliferous.  I looked it up and it was not clear to me the difference between soboliferous and stoloniferous.  Is there a simple explanation of the difference?

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

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Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Fantastic plants and scenes, David!

According to Harris & Harris' Plant Identification Terminology: An Illustrated Glossary (an excellent book, IMO), a sobol is "a shoot arising from the base of a stem or from the rhizome", while a stolon is "an elongate, horizontal stem creeping along the ground and rooting at the nodes or at the tip and giving rise to a new plant".  That description, and the illustrations, imply that stolons are above-ground rooting stems (e.g. like on a strawberry plant) while sobols are below ground.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Sellars
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Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-29

Thanks Lori.  That certainly fits how they grow in the wild.  They are not a spreading plant but rather pop up randomly in the loose scree.

David Sellars
From the Wet Coast of British Columbia, Canada

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Barstow
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-08-27

Just seen these magnificent pictures - amazing that there are such sights in August! What kind of elevations were these pictures taken at? Loved the Erytronium meadow and Allium crenulatum - anyone succeeded growing this one?

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

David, glorious plants and photos, it almost seems like one is actually there seeing them in person, the Collomia and Petrophytum views particularly compelling!  It is my one biggest regret, in the 4 years that I lived near Seattle Washington, that I never made it out to the Olympics; instead making numerous trips to the dryland central and eastern parts of the State, with my favorite haunt being the Wenatchee Mountains.

Stephenb wrote:

Just seen these magnificent pictures - amazing that there are such sights in August! What kind of elevations were these pictures taken at? Loved the Erytronium meadow and Allium crenulatum - anyone succeeded growing this one?

Allium crenulatum 'Olympic Sunset'
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=31.msg181#msg181

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Anne Spiegel
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-26

[quote author=David Sellars link=topic=761.msg10889#msg10889 date=1313640405]
Anne:

If I can get some seed of Collomia debilis I will give it a try.  I have not grown Allium crenulatum either.  I collected some seed of Phacelia sericea last year in our local mountains and now have five vigorous plants growing in pots with lovely silvery foliage. Have you tried it in the garden?  I understand it is a challenge. /
It's pretty easy from seed and quick to bloom stage.  It seems to want scree but getting it to stick around for more than a couple of years is the difficulty here.  I think the summer mugs are not to its liking.  Knowing where it grows that's hardly surprising.
Good luck.  Should you ever have extra seed of Collomia debilis v larsenii, I'd love to have a little.  Every time I've seen the collomia it was growing on a steep scree and that's where I'd try growing it.

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