Lilies, anyone?

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Gene Mirro
Title: Guest
Joined: 2010-02-25

Nice stems of michiganense.  I can grow them here, but they won't set seed, even with hand pollination.  Maybe it has something to do with temperature. 

SW Washington state, 600 ft. altitude

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Rick

the Lilium majoense is very similar to L. poilanei which I grow.

Also here is a picture of L. michiganense growing by a river at Kleinburg Ontario ten days ago

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I did consider L. poilanei, but at the time I thought it was native only to the southeast Asian peninsula.  No way would it be winter hardy here in zone 4!  In fact years ago, I passed on an offer of seed of the species because of that.  Now I see it is native in Yunnan also.  And foliage seems most similar to L. poilanei.  Definitely three veined, thick and waxy.  It was more thick and waxy when I grew it in full sun, but it seems more happy here in open shade.  So maybe...

       

Not too common for L. michiganense to have a tiered inflorescence.  It must be doing very well.  I meant to ask you, what is that twining thing on it?

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

Rick

I cannot help with the twining thing. The lily was growing just above the waterline on a small river in the grounds surrounding the McMichael art gallery and was taken with the zoom from about 50 feet away.

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Does L michiganense need very moist soil?

Not many species lilies here at my summerhouse but a few others like these 'Capuchino' and 'Graffity'. ...and one which isn't a lily, Kniphofia uvaria!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hoy wrote:

Does L michiganense need very moist soil?

In my experience, if Lilium michiganense doesn't get constantly moist soil, it will still flower, but the plant won't be that long lived (and of course, flowers will be smaller).  A few times now I have grown seedlings in places that get dry and hot in summer; They take a longer time to get to flowering, and then flower okay for a year or perhaps two and then slowly decline.  The nice thing about stoloniferous lilies is that easily dive down in the soil to find their proper growing depth for the area.

Below is an example of how stoloniferous bulbs can seek their proper depth in the soil. The original little seedling bulb from last season is at the top. This season it sent out two stolons terminating in bulbs. "Up" is up in the pic, "down" is down in the pic. The structure looks like the photo was taken at an angle because the new bulbs are so much larger, but no. The plant lays flat on the soil surface with the camera directly above.

             

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lilium papilliferum is not too well formed this season, due to the excess heat, I think.
             

Lilium auratum seems to be fairly happy with the root competition of other herbaceous plants.  Here it grows amidst Hakonechloa macra 'All Gold', Helleborus Royal Heritage and Brunnera 'Jack Frost'.
       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Afloden
Title: Guest
Joined: 2012-01-15

The twiner looks like a Cynanchum.

Polainei was very common where exposed limestone was present in N Vietnam. Most plants had 1 -2 seed pods, but a few had more than 12.

On the western part of a ridge looking down into Yunnan there was another Lilium that appears more like majoense. This are was in the Tule volcanic belt on the eastern edge of the Hoang Lein range whereas polainei seemed to prefer the limestones around Sapa. It seemed clearly distinct from polainei, but I'm not sure. I have pictures (that are not mine) of it in flower.

Majoense was described from not far to the north in Majo, Yunnan and another similar plant from N and E into SW Guizhou.

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Really enjoying all of these fine lilies here, beautiful things they are!  Wish lily beetle wasn't such a problem here.

I agree Aaron the red-flowered twining plant is a Cynanchum, here's a couple links. Most species in this widespread genus are weedy, some invasives, but some good ones too.
http://blog.nexcerpt.com/2010/05/21/swallowwort/
http://blog.nexcerpt.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/DSCN7772_50.jpg

One of my favorites is Cynanchum ascyrifolium (Vincetoxicum ascyrifolium), "Cruel Plant", not sure why that common name, one of my top favorite perennials, a subject worthy of a separate topic. :)

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Thanks Aaron.  We don't always say so, but your expertise is very graciously appreciated (and essential!).

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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