Lilies, anyone?

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Hoy wrote:

Do you think any of the western lilies could do here?
I am very fascinated by lilies but as I have told slugs devour the plants as fast as I get them. At my summerhouse though they fare better. However there I have to watch for lily beetles >:( Still many lilies do very well there.

I don't think I can say.  I'm just not knowledgeable enough with these.  Many like a long dry summer, but cool and wet winter/spring.  L. columbianum (known to be more easily cultivated) seems to survive for certain people in the UK, and L. pardalinum likes wetter situations throughout the year, so...

Perhaps Gene Mirro will lend some advice here.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

My last lily to bloom for the year,Lilium auratum in the garden growing through a rhododendron

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Nice, Tony.  I didn't photograph my auratums this season, because I didn't think I could top the pictures I took in a previous year.  These are also from bulbs procured from the Species Lily Preservation Group:

          Lilium auratum

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lilium leichtlinii is one of the lily species that seems to have evolved in the wild growing up through underbrush.  Even when grown out in the open, the first foot of the stem is void of leaves, and then progresses to full leaf size at 2 feet.  The inflorescense structure shown is typical for the species.

    Lilium leichtlinii    17 July 2011

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Lilium formosanum is a species not thought to be generally hardy in USDA zone 4, but certain ones are, and I assume that provenance is involved.  The species type can be very tall, often reaching more than 6 ft., and sometimes requires staking, at least in the U.S.  Compared to most lilies, it is more susceptible to viruses, but grows quickly from seed.  (Lily seeds do not carry virus, even if they are produced by an infected plant.)

Lilium formosanum var. pricei is a dwarf variety from higher altitudes (but still low elevation in alpine terms) and grows only 1-2 ft.    These pictured are 12 inch beauties:

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

        Lilium papilliferum      16 Jul 2011

       

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

L. formosanum and papilliferum are gorgeous, Rick!  I don't think I've even heard of the latter.

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Lori wrote:

L. formosanum and papilliferum are gorgeous, Rick!  I don't think I've even heard of the latter.

Rick, I will second this motion, both are stunning.  Now, I do grow L. formosanum var. pricei, not long lived at all and seems monocarpic, but I've had it blooming in the garden for many years from self-sown seedlings and MMcD-assisted-disseminated seed.  It is rarely over a foot tall, sometimes to about 16", but it is typically just one or two stalks, never making a fine grassy clump like yours.  The flowers on mine show dark red striping on the backs, not as fine a white flowers as in yours. My guess is there is more than one form of this going around; I like your form much better than what I grow.  And yes, lily beetles do go after it somewhat, but they don't seem to be as much a magnet for their attacks as are Fritillaria species.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Do you try to spellbind me, Rick?
Now I am bound to try more lilies ;)

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

The very possible (probable?) monocarpic trait of L. formosanum var. pricei is well known, but I am guessing it may be at least somewhat dependent on how the plants grow: too vigorous and the monocarpic tendency grows with it.  These particular ones I have pictured are ridiculously slow growing for the species.  I have grown them deliberately twice from seed, and while I admit I am not the best caretaker of my flora, the first seedlings take three seasons to flower, and the rest four!  In fact, I have never had more than one flower per stalk. 

The clump pictured is not a single plant, nor from a single plant.  There are at least as many genetically different bulbs as there is flowers, and it is the result of a pot of seedlings plunked undivided in the ground.  This particular clump has been blooming for five years, although I can't say if any of the bulbs have died a natural death, and replaced by other bulbs-in-waiting.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

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