First hike of the year - Forgetmenot Ridge, Kananaskis Country, Alberta

29 posts / 0 new
Last post
Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Zigadenus elegans, very common on the ridge:

Anemone lithophila, in seed, as is this Rhodiola integrifolia, and Campanula uniflora, and Physaria didymocarpa:
     

Dasiphora fruticosa:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Arnica angustifolia:
 

Cirsium hookerianum with Hedysarum sulphurescens:

Solidago multiradiata:
 

Salix sp. (I'll have to try to figure these out some day.   :))

Gentiana prostrata, a tiny biennial, only a couple of centimeters tall:
 

Scenery:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Solidago spathulata:

Penstemon procerus:

Chives (a native plant), Allium schoenoprasum var. sibiricum:

And in a slightly moister area (a possible seep) in the slightly lower area that we refer to as "the saddle" between the ridges and the summit approach, Pedicularis groenlandicum - the center photo shows why a common name is "elephant head":
   

Myosotis asiatica:

Floral richness, and silver willows in the saddle area:
 

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Booker
Booker's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2010-01-30

Another wonderful hike, Lori ... all very much appreciated.

Cliff Booker A.K.A. Ranunculus
On the moors in Lancashire, U.K.
Usually wet, often windy, sometimes cold ... and that's just me!

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Thanks, Cliff!

Castilleja - I have the feeling that these photos captured characteristics that should be pretty distinct towards a species ID.  Any opinions (... passing the buck   ;D):
 

Unknown Aster(?) - another one to figure out:

And growing on the slopes of the saddle area (while Eriogonum androsaceum grows on the scree of the ridge), here is what I have finally realized is Eriogonum ovalifolium var. ovalifolium (the variety according to Moss & Packer) - please correct me if I'm wrong!
       

Aside from the foliage, these slides show what I believe are the characteristics of the flower detail that distinguish the two species:
 

Please take a look and see if you agree!

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

A great couple of hikes, Lori! So many gems, and fascinating some of the species that grow at so many altitudes, flowering over many months -Physaria flowers in May in the Kootenay Plains (11 or 1200metres?) (weirder yet, those that seem to flower at the same time down here and up there-- Delphinium glaucum seems close!)

The Eriogonums seem right  based on those photos.. could you tell that from a visual inspection in person? Did you have to pull apart an inflorescence?

How tall does the Saussurea get in flower? Does it have a leafy flowering stem( I know I could just google it, not tonight..lol) it kind of reminds me of something I saw at the Icefields, but not in flower.. a largish plant for that site though... I'll have to dig for a photo and compare on google..

Leptarrhena pyrolifolia is interesting, not sure I've heard of this, though may be just forgetting..

Really nice flowerhead on the Anaphalis.. like the Packera contermina too-- which leaves belong to it? green, glabrous obovate?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

cohan wrote:

The Eriogonums seem right  based on those photos.. could you tell that from a visual inspection in person? Did you have to pull apart an inflorescence?

I had to pull apart some flowerheads to look for stipes or no stipes to convince myself of the ID for E. androsaceum, but having done that, the various species are recognizable without going to that detail.

cohan wrote:

How tall does the Saussurea get in flower? Does it have a leafy flowering stem( I know I could just google it, not tonight..lol) it kind of reminds me of something I saw at the Icefields, but not in flower.. a largish plant for that site though... I'll have to dig for a photo and compare on google..

Saussurea nuda gets to about 1.5" tall, maybe 2" tall max, and a huge one would be perhaps up to 12" across, where I've seen it.   Edit: Well, maybe I should really expand that height range up to about 5".

cohan wrote:

Leptarrhena pyrolifolia is interesting, not sure I've heard of this, though may be just forgetting..
Packera contermina too-- which leaves belong to it? green, glabrous obovate?

Actually, I suspect what I have been calling Leptarrhena pyrolifolia is actually a saxifrage... I've been meaning to go back through all my pix and figure this out and correct my labels!
A photo in this thread gives a better view of the hairy, angular leaves of Packera contermina:
http://nargs.org/smf/index.php?topic=343.msg3756#msg3756

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Well, that will save me time looking at Saussurea... the plants I'm talking about are much larger, and I still have no idea what they are...lol

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Pages

Log in or register to post comments