Epimedium 2011

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WimB
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Epimedium 2011

The first Epi's are in flower here :D :D :D

E. x versicolor 'Cherry Tart'
E. x warleyense (I suspect this is E. x warleyense 'Orangekönigin', like the one on the next pic...but I'm not sure, so until I'm sure I'll keep it named as the pure hybrid)
E. x warleyense 'Orangekönigin'
and a very young plant of E. x youngianum 'Freckles' Cc. 950080 (2 last pics)

Mark McD
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Joined: 2009-12-14

WimB wrote:

The first Epi's are in flower here  :D :D :D

E. x versicolor 'Cherry Tart'
E. x warleyense (I suspect this is E. x warleyense 'Orangekönigin', like the one on the next pic...but I'm not sure, so until I'm sure I'll keep it named as the pure hybrid)
E. x warleyense 'Orangekönigin'
and a very young plant of E. x youngianum 'Freckles' Cc. 950080 (2 last pics)

Excellent start to the Epi season Wim!  We're in suspended animation here, sunny but days so cold and just above freezing that even the crocus aren't opening up, and with deep freezes at night.  

E. x versicolor 'Cherry Tart' is by far one of the best of the newer introductions by Darrell Probst, a real beauty, and one of the few x versicolor cultivars. Not sure if this one is fertile, as most versicolor cultivars are sterile.

So I went digging through my photos of E. x warleyense, and I don't have any good comparative shots of it with the cultivar 'Orangekönigin'.  It is reported that the latter has flowers a shade or two paler than x warleyense, but with darker orange veins, and has shorter rhizomes thus forming a denser clump.  I found a few photos of E. x warleyense, but none that are true closeup views of the flowers, and no photos of 'Orangekönigin', so I will try to get some photos later on.  I do find that regular E. x warleyense is sterile and produces no pollen, on the other hand 'Orangekönigin' does produce pollen. Based on photo dates, my plants typically start blooming the first week of May.

If one grows E. x warleyense in full sun, as I do, the leaves take on beautiful bronzy red and orange tones, whereas in shade they remain bright green.  Also, it flowers much more heavily in sun, making an orange splash in the spring landscape.

For information only:  hybrid seedlings of E. x youngianum 'Freckles' will often inherit the varied leaf speckling.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
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I picked up a E. wushanense at the WWSW last month..it has 4 flower stems in the basement window.  Suppose to be evergreen but I doubt it will be in my area...not even sure it will be hardy but the holly-like leaflets were too cool to pass up!

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Todd wrote:

I picked up a E. wushanense at the WWSW last month..it has 4 flower stems in the basement window.  Suppose to be evergreen but I doubt it will be in my area...not even sure it will be hardy but the holly-like leaflets were too cool to pass up!

Todd, that's a great species to "pick up".  I don't grow the regular more upright form (wish I did), but do grow the one Darrell Probst calls the "spiny-leaved form" which is lower growing.  This winter seemed to be a particularly hard text-book winter to challenge the evergreeniness of supposedly evergreen plants in New England.  If I have time, I'll post the results from this year later on. As always however, E. wushanense "spiny-leaved form" came through looking fairly good but with some leaf burn, whereas some of the species I characterize as reliably evergreen such as E. pinnatum ssp. colchicum and E. pubigerum took a total beating... I have already trimmed off the foliage for the spring season.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Boland
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Mine has spiney-edged leaves...I wonder if it will turn out to be the smaller form.  The plants came from Phillip McDougal.

This 'spring' has been so horrid it will still be weeks before I know the status of plants in the garden.  I expect my dwarf Japanese maple, Sharp's Pygmy, will be toast as the snow is as hard as concrete and still has feet to melt.  Evergreens will probably be fine (no exposure to cause winter burn) EXCEPT for being like pancakes.  Oh when I think of my evergreen ferns not to mention hellebores.

Todd Boland
St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
Zone 5b
1800 mm precipitation per year

Reed
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Todd wrote:

I picked up a E. wushanense at the WWSW last month..it has 4 flower stems in the basement window.  Suppose to be evergreen but I doubt it will be in my area...not even sure it will be hardy but the holly-like leaflets were too cool to pass up!

It is evergreen at 9 Deg. here in Oregon with no snow. :)
James

Albany, Oregon USA. Pacific Northwest, elevation approximately 200ft zone 8. Winter wet and Summer Dry. Hot enough to ripen the peaches.

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

No Epimediums here yet!

Wim, where do you get your plants from?

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

WimB
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Hoy wrote:

No Epimediums here yet!

Wim, where do you get your plants from?

Trond,

my Eppies come from different sources. Some from Koen van Poucke: http://www.koenvanpoucke.be/, some from Epimedium nursery: http://www.epimedium.be/nederlands/home.html and some from Darrell Probst. The ones I've shown here this year already come from Epimedium nursery.

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

Thanks, Wim. It is a pity Norway isn't a EU member, makes mailing plants very difficult!

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

WimB
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Joined: 2011-01-31

Hoy wrote:

Thanks, Wim. It is a pity Norway isn't a EU member, makes mailing plants very difficult!

You're welcome. Does Norway have a very strict import policy? I thought it was exempt from all red tape under EEA (European Economic Area) law? I believe we (in Belgium) may import up to 5 plants from Norway with a rootball without having to apply for a phyto. (I'm not very sure, though)

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Hoy
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Joined: 2009-12-15

WimB wrote:

Hoy wrote:

Thanks, Wim. It is a pity Norway isn't a EU member, makes mailing plants very difficult!

You're welcome. Does Norway have a very strict import policy? I thought it was exempt from all red tape under EEA (European Economic Area) law? I believe we (in Belgium) may import up to 5 plants from Norway with a rootball without having to apply for a phyto. (I'm not very sure, though)

It is a strict private import policy on plants although we are a EEA member. They say they are afraid of diseases but I suspect the nursery industry and big retailers (in Norway) want the marked to themselves. Live plants is difficult but bulbs are easier. And I can import 50 small packets of garden seeds in one parcel.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

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