Miscellaneous Woodlanders

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Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

gerrit wrote:

This is Mertensia virginica. A plant native in the USA. In my part of the world  seldom seen in culture. I wonder if you regard this plant as special, or regard it as almost weed. I understand one won't grow a plant in his garden, while it grows in everybody's garden.
Myself I like it very much, because of it's color,a deep, heavenly blue.

Gerrit, I would love to grow M virginica and have tried to establish it several times but the slug think I plant them for their sake and devour the plants almost before I have left the site.

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

not sure if these qualify as woodlanders but here is Meconopsis punicea flowering for me now. In the main picture the one second from the left is clearly a hybrid

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

Tony wrote:

not sure if these qualify as woodlanders but here is Meconopsis punicea flowering for me now. In the main picture the one second from the left is clearly a hybrid

Pretty plants! I have tried to establish M punicea here for years but without success so far.....

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

Mertensia virginica (Virginia Bluebells) is fairly common among shade gardeners here, although fairly difficult to find in nurseries.  It is well loved, and though it is native in Minnesota, it is only abundant in the very southeast portion of the state.  Some gardeners find it a bit weedy, but easy to control, while most are delighted with the gentle self seeding.  Two State parks are especially famous for their natural ephemeral wildflowers, and each have quarter acre areas of mostly Virginia bluebells, with Erythronium spp., Enemion (Isopyrum) biternatum, Thalictrum spp., Asarum canadense, Uvularia grandiflora, etc.  They are truly a sight to see.

Mertensia paniculata grows in the northern half of Minnesota, and I grew a plant at my parents (along with Mertensia virginca) for many years when I was growing up. Some years after I moved out, my brother (the machinist turned self proclaimed naturalist) destroyed it while it was dormant, replacing it with Wild Ginger.  :'(  Our form has a much more metalic blue color that practically sparkles, rather than your matte baby blue, Cohan.  The shape is more rigid and regular, too.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Tony wrote:

not sure if these qualify as woodlanders but here is Meconopsis punicea flowering for me now.

Wow, most enviable, Tony!  Meconopsis tend to need special conditions to survive here in "The Big High and Dry" (as I've seen it described by a local gardening writer  :))  any more than a season or two... which I'm much too lazy to provide...

gerrit wrote:

This is Mertensia virginica. A plant native in the USA. In my part of the world  seldom seen in culture. I wonder if you regard this plant as special, or regard it as almost weed.

Definitely special!  (And I rigorously distinguish native plants from weeds, as well.  Having said that, it just depends on the native plant's habits, and how well I can grow it, as to whether I keep it in the garden.)

Both the natural areas and your sadly-missed planting sound wonderful, Rick.

I loving seeing our native M. paniculata also.  I find it rather spready in the garden... given that I don't have unlimited space, I think I will be pulling a few more offshoots out next year.

I like Mertensia ciliata in the garden, and have lots these days from seeding... and please correct me (always) if I'm misidentifying this!... not native here, but no doubt a locally-native plant for someone on this forum.   One strange thing... these used to go dormant for me after the spring bloom, but have ceased doing that in the last 3 years or so ( ???), and in fact, get lax and floppy enough that I cut them back.
The emerging foliage is a gorgeous dusky purple-green, as shown in this older photo (the foliage was barely breaking the ground on the most precocious plant last weekend, before the latest snow).  Here are also photos of it in bloom.
     

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

Barstow
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Title: Member
Joined: 2010-08-27

I've also been growing Mertensia ciliata for a number of years, at least that's what I got it as (I'm adding a few pictures). I have it in a fairly open sunny location and perhaps because of that it looks taller than Lori's plant. I also cut it right back as it falls over. I'm looking forward to comparing with M. paniculata which I planted out last year (from seed that Cohan kindly sent).

Stephen Barstow
Malvik, Norway
63.4N
Age: Lower end of the 20-25,000 day range

cohan
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Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Tony wrote:

not sure if these qualify as woodlanders but here is Meconopsis punicea flowering for me now. In the main picture the one second from the left is clearly a hybrid

Wonderful colour! Is this the mature form of the flower? Very interesting... Does the species name refers to pomegranates, presumably for the colour?

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Tony Willis
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-01

cohan wrote:

Tony wrote:

not sure if these qualify as woodlanders but here is Meconopsis punicea flowering for me now. In the main picture the one second from the left is clearly a hybrid

Wonderful colour! Is this the mature form of the flower? Very interesting... Does the species name refers to pomegranates, presumably for the colour?

My understanding is the word relates to red which is also the colour of pomegranates but there are numerous other plants with it in their name

Lori S.
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-10-27

Yes, according to the site below, "puniceus" is purple, red, or reddish:
http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/Latin/

Lori
Calgary, Alberta, Canada - Zone 3
-30 C to +30 C (rarely!); elevation ~1130m; annual precipitation ~40 cm

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

M ciliata seems nice.. there are several species  on Alplains' list I am thinking about .. I'd want something quite distinct from paniculata, since there is so much of that here! Lori, I wonder if ciliata has not gone dormant the last two years since we didn't have summer? ;) and the year before that was record rainfall, though warm, here, not sure about Calgary..
BTW, I wonder if paniculata would be considered ephemeral in a longer/hotter summer? By the time they are dying down here, summer is over anyway!

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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