Iris cristata and small woodland Iris

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RickR
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-09-21

I suspect "lacustris" refers to the fact that it is found native only near the shores of the upper great lakes (Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan).  Iris lacustris certainly does not need wet conditions.  It often grows in rocky outcrops and with little soil and full sun, although I don't know if that is the norm.  Mine grow in mostly shade, in rich, dry soil infested with maple roots.  A very adaptable plant.

Rick Rodich    zone 4a.    Annual precipitation ~24 inches
near Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA

Hoy
Hoy's picture
Title: Member
Joined: 2009-12-15

RickR wrote:

I suspect "lacustris" refers to the fact that it is found native only near the shores of the upper great lakes (Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Michigan).  Iris lacustris certainly does not need wet conditions.  It often grows in rocky outcrops and with little soil and full sun, although I don't know if that is the norm.  Mine grow in mostly shade, in rich, dry soil infested with maple roots.  A very adaptable plant.

Good to know! I was thinking "lacustris" meant on the (wet) shore.
I looked at my irises today and it's a sad sight. Almost all the leaves are damaged by slugs although I've been out every evening killing them. The cool weather makes the plants growing very slowly and the slugs get the upper hand :(

Trond
Rogaland, Norway - with cool, often rainy summers  (29C max) and mild, often rainy winters (180 cm/year)!

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Back from a week of training in Dallas Texas for my job, I noticed my newly purchased Iris cristata 'Montrose White' most leaf fans had collapsed and detach at the slightest touch. There were a few small slugs around the pot, which I disposed of, I suspected they were the culprit.  Overnight, the rest of the leaves were damaged and fell off, I think more is going on.  I washed all soil off, looking for view weevil larvae or adults, found none, but directly below where I was working I found a brown marmorated stink bug (an invasive here) that may have been the source of damage.

The roots are still looking healthy, so I will replant this someplace and hope that the now naked rhizome rejuvenates.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Iris gracilipes 'Cobblewood Charm' is in full bloom, floriferous and elegant.  This introduction by Darrell Probst is a hybrid between the dwarf white form known as "Buko" and regular I. gracilipes, this selection inheriting some of the compact size from "Buko".  The flowers are beautifully marked.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

WimB
WimB's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-01-31

McDonough wrote:

Back from a week of training in Dallas Texas for my job, I noticed my newly purchased Iris cristata 'Montrose White' most leaf fans had collapsed and detach at the slightest touch. There were a few small slugs around the pot, which I disposed of, I suspected they were the culprit.  Overnight, the rest of the leaves were damaged and fell off, I think more is going on.  I washed all soil off, looking for view weevil larvae or adults, found none, but directly below where I was working I found a brown marmorated stink bug (an invasive here) that may have been the source of damage.

The roots are still looking healthy, so I will replant this someplace and hope that the now naked rhizome rejuvenates.

:( :(  I'm pretty sure they will regrow, though!

McDonough wrote:

Iris gracilipes 'Cobblewood Charm' is in full bloom, floriferous and elegant.  This introduction by Darrell Probst is a hybrid between the dwarf white form known as "Buko" and regular I. gracilipes, this selection inheriting some of the compact size from "Buko".  The flowers are beautifully marked.

Super form, Mark!

Wim Boens
Wingene Belgium zone 8a

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

Collected seed today on 5 varieties of Iris cristata plus 1 pod each on two varieties of Iris verna.  Given that the Iris patches flowered well this spring, it is surprising that so little seed was set.  Last week I harvested 1 pod on I. koreana and about 6 pods on I. odaesanensis.  Thus far I have had limited success growing these woodland Iris from seed, odaesanensis yielding best germination, but that said, germination is generally very low with all of them.

So, I must experiment with different sowing techniques, to see if I can improve germination rates.  All of my meager harvest will be sown (sorry, not enough seed to share this year).  If anyone has suggestions for sowing techniques with woodland Iris, I would be grateful to hear.

Iris cristata stems and pods collected in plastic bags, where they will be allowed to open on their own.
Checking a couple sample pods, they seemed ready to harvest.

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Mark, have you read the threads on SRGC about surgery on iris seeds? Folks were doing complicated things to cut through seedcoats etc..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

Mark McD
Title: Moderator
Joined: 2009-12-14

cohan wrote:

Mark, have you read the threads on SRGC about surgery on iris seeds? Folks were doing complicated things to cut through seedcoats etc..

No, I haven't seen those threads.  Can you point me in the right direction with a URL or two?

Mark McDonough
Massachusetts, USA, near the New Hampshire border USDA Zone 5
antennaria at aol.com
 

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

I was hoping you wouldn't ask that...lol-- it was quite some time ago I saw them, and now don't remember for sure if it was  a seed thread or in Irises, I think the latter, but I'll take a look if my internet connection co-operates.. if nothing else works, Maggi may remember..

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

cohan
cohan's picture
Title: Guest
Joined: 2011-02-03

Okay, I think it should be in this thread- can't go through all the way, right now, but another reference to cutting the seeds on SRGC mentioned this thread:
http://www.srgc.net/forum/index.php?topic=847.0

west central alberta, canada; just under 1000m; record temps:min -45C/-49F;max 34C/93F; http://picasaweb.google.ca/cactuscactus  http://urbanehillbillycanada.blogspot.com/

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